Page 0036

36 English Bridge February 2016 www.ebu.co.uk

ing auction. It's true that if you dealt a large number of random

hands, you would find many more weak 1NT openings

than strong 1NT openings. However, when you hold such

hands in second, third or fourth seat, there is more chance

that an opponent will open in front of you - particularly

nowadays. So, the frequency argument loses its power. Also,

of course, you risk the occasional catastrophic penalty if you

are so bold as to play a weak 1NT when vulnerable.

Am I ever going to discuss the bidding of the hand from

the England-Poland match? Er… yes. Gunnar Hallberg bid

Stayman, looking for a spade fit, and heard 2t. His

subsequent 4NT bid was a limit bid, non-forcing but inviting

a slam if his partner was maximum. With only 15 points and

an unproductive 4-3-3-3 shape, Holland was happy to pass.

6® is slightly better than 6NT, since you can ruff a diamond.

However, you would still need to pick up the clubs for one

loser (guessing which defender was more likely to hold ®Ax

and leading through his ace on the first round).

Awards: 4NT (10), 5® (8), 5NT (6), 6® (5), 6NT (3)

We take a look at the England Seniors now,

facing Poland in the quarter-finals of the

d'Orsi Trophy. John Holland opens a 15-17

point 1NT. Although the weak 1NT is still

immensely popular in English clubs, most

players around the world prefer the strong

1NT. A popular argument in favour of the

weak 1NT is that it occurs much more often

and is then a solid springboard for the ensu4.game

All. Dealer East with 9 points and two kings opposite a 2® opening. Let's see

if megastars, Meckstroth and Rodwell can do as well:

2t showed a balanced hand with 8-10 points and 2NT asked

for a major. 4NT was slam-invitational and 5NT showed an

in-between hand, leaving the last move to West.

Justin Hackett led the tQ against the unusual contract of

5NT. Rodwell won and played four rounds of clubs, followed

by a finesse of the ™10. Justin won and cleared a diamond

trick. After three rounds of spades, Rodwell finessed the ™Q,

North winning and claiming the setting trick in diamonds.

That was 12 IMPs to England.

Awards: 4NT (10), 5NT (7), 6NT (5)

West East

Holland Hallberg

1NT 2®

2t 4NT

3.N/S Game. Dealer West

´ A K 2 ´ Q 10 5 3

™ Q J 7 ™ A K 2

t K 10 8 t A 6

® Q 9 8 7 ® K 5 4 3

N

W E

S

´ 6 2

™ K J 6 3

t Q J 10

® 8 7 5 4

´ A K 4 ´ Q 9 7

™ A Q 10 8 ™ 7 5 4

t A 6 5 t K 3 2

® A Q 6 ® K J 10 2

´ J 10 8 5 3

™ 9 2

t 9 8 7 4

® 9 3

N

W E

S

West North East South

Bakhshi Katz Gold Nickell

Pass Pass

2® Pass 2t Pass

2NT Pass 4NT

West North East South

Rodwell Justin H Meckstroth Jason H

Pass Pass

1® Pass 2t Pass

2NT Pass 3NT Pass

4NT Pass 5NT

Again we see a natural 4NT limit-bid raise of

a no-trump bid. Bakhshi had no reason to

advance and the England pair stopped safely

NICKO RESULTS

The National InterClub Knockout (NICKO) has been won by Bristol B who beat Petersield B by 42

imps over the 48 board inal. Bristol took an early lead, and won ive of the six sessions in a very

friendly and good spirited match.

Index

  1. Page 0036
  2. Page 0036
  3. Page 0036
  4. Page 0036
  5. Page 0036
  6. Page 0036
  7. Page 0036
  8. Page 0036
  9. Page 0036
  10. Page 0036
  11. Page 0036
  12. Page 0036
  13. Page 0036
  14. Page 0036
  15. Page 0036
  16. Page 0036
  17. Page 0036
  18. Page 0036
  19. Page 0036
  20. Page 0036
  21. Page 0036
  22. Page 0036
  23. Page 0036
  24. Page 0036
  25. Page 0036
  26. Page 0036
  27. Page 0036
  28. Page 0036
  29. Page 0036
  30. Page 0036
  31. Page 0036
  32. Page 0036
  33. Page 0036
  34. Page 0036
  35. Page 0036
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0036
  38. Page 0036
  39. Page 0036
  40. Page 0036
  41. Page 0036
  42. Page 0036
  43. Page 0036
  44. Page 0036
  45. Page 0036
  46. Page 0036
  47. Page 0036
  48. Page 0036
  49. Page 0036
  50. Page 0036
  51. Page 0036
  52. Page 0036
  53. Page 0036
  54. Page 0036
  55. Page 0036
  56. Page 0036
  57. Page 0036
  58. Page 0036
  59. Page 0036
  60. Page 0036
  61. Page 0036
  62. Page 0036
  63. Page 0036
  64. Page 0036
  65. Page 0036
  66. Page 0036
  67. Page 0036
  68. Page 0036
  69. Page 0036
  70. Page 0036
  71. Page 0036
  72. Page 0036
  73. Page 0036
  74. Page 0036
  75. Page 0036
  76. Page 0036
  77. Page 0036
  78. Page 0036

powered by PageTiger