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April 2016 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

(a) a spade: 10 marks. The best lead in my view,

giving us the chance to set up some tricks in

partner's hand. After all we need at least two tricks

from partner in order to beat this.

(b) a heart: 2 marks. A horrible lead! Firstly dummy

will have at least six trumps and declarer's shortest

suit is likely to be hearts - it is pretty unlikely he will

be ruffing anything so a trump achieves nothing.

And it might be disastrous - imagine dummy with

™A-J-9-x-x-x and declarer with ™K-x for example,

won't partner be pleased?

(c) tA: 1 mark. Again just way too aggressive. Every

time declarer has the king that is a cheap trick you

have given away which is unlikely to come back

again.

(d) a club: 6 marks. Well if I wasn't going to lead a

spade this would be my choice but it is far inferior

to a spade in my view. Firstly it is highly unlikely

you can set up more than one trick in the suit unless

partner starts ruffing but declarer may be

able to draw trumps quickly if that looks likely.

Second, you may well set up discards for declarer.

That is what happened at the table when dummy

was 3-6-3-1 with a singleton ®Q and declarer had

®K-J-x so the spade losers went away.

HHHHHH

West North East South

1NT1

Pass 4NT2 Pass 6NT

All pass

1 12-14; 2 Natural and invitational

Choose from: (a) ´K; (b) ™2; (c) a diamond; (d) ®8.

It would seem that partner has his usual rubber

bridge hand(!) so you will have to beat this on your

own. Moreover your fate may well not be in your

hands - if both major suit aces are in dummy for

example you are not going to beat this. Your

problem is to give yourself the best chance of

beating it if at least one of those aces is in declarer's

hand - so protect your high cards.

(a) ´K: 6 marks. If I wasn't going to lead a diamond

this would be my choice. You are hoping declarer

Hand 3

´ K Q 10 2

™ K 5 3 2

t 7 6 5 2

® 8

will need to take the heart finesse to you in order to

generate enough tricks and then you cash the spade.

But it could just as likely give away the twelfth trick.

(b) ™2: 1 mark. Really? Giving declarer a cheap trick

in a situation where you KNOW partner has no

high cards. No thanks!

(c) a diamond: 10 marks. This would be my choice.

It gives nothing away and lets declarer get on with it.

If it makes so be it, but at least you have not

committed felo de se.

(d)®8: 3 marks. I don't like this as it is not as safe as

it looks. Given the opposition have bid 6NT with a

combined 32 count (at most) one or the other may

well have a 5 card suit and this is most likely to be

clubs. Imagine for example dummy's clubs being

K-Q-10-9-x and declarer's A-x-x - wouldn't that be

unfortunate … r

LONDON has won the Tollemache Cup, the

inter-county championships for teams of eight.

They finished on 105 VPs, well ahead of the

field. Kent was second with 86, with Surrey

third with 79.

This was the 20th time that London has won

the event, though it was the first time since

2006 - defending champions Middlesex were

fifth. It was a seventh victory in the competition

for Nick, a fifth for Tom, fourth for Frank, and

third for Rob - all others were winning for the

first time. r

LONDON WINS

TOLLEMACHE

London Tollemache team - Franklin To, Willie

Coyle, Graham Orsmond, Rob Cliffe, Kieran

Dyke, Tom Townsend, Mike Bell, Stelio di Bello,

Phil King and Nick Sandqvist (not pictured)

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