Page 0042

42 English Bridge April 2016 www.ebu.co.uk

THIS issue we turn our attention to the opening

bidder, who, whilst faced with a fairly easy choice on

the first round can often find himself end-played

later on.

Let's look first at the simple idea of rebidding

your own suit.

In traditional Acol, hands with a long suit were

grouped into three categories. Hands of about eight

tricks would open a strong two, hands with about

seven tricks would open one of their suit and rebid

three and hands of about six tricks were a normal

opening bid.

Nowadays strong twos have gone the way of the

sabre-toothed tiger - feared and respected, but seen

by no-one. Hands of eight tricks are either opened

with a game force initially or opened at the one level

and then driven to game facing a response.

Hands of seven tricks still follow the general rule

though and they open at the one level and then

jump rebid in their own suit to invite game. The

point range for such bids is about 16-17, with some

good 15s thrown in along the way, and the odd poor

18 as well.

Obviously you need to look at a lot of factors that

make a hand, as a partial fit with partner,

intermediate cards and honour structure are all just

as important as point count. The point about

intermediate cards is easily seen if you consider

having a small singleton in partner's suit. You are

much more likely to be able to develop tricks with

A-K-10-9-8-2 than A-K-6-5-4-3.

When you make a jump rebid in your own suit

partner can pass, you are inviting game but not

forcing. However if he does bid on then the auction

becomes game forcing, so, for example, a raise of 3®

to 4® would be a slam try.

Let's see which of these hands fall into the various

categories. In each case you open your longest suit

and partner responds 1´. What do you rebid?

Opener's rebid by Michael Byrne

Traps for the Unwary

Traps for the Unwary

click

link

Hand 4 Hand 5

´ Q 2 ´ A Q 3

™ K Q 3 ™ K J 4

t A Q t A K J 9 7 3 2

® K 9 5 4 3 2 ® -

Hand 1 Hand 2 Hand 3

´ J 5 ´ K 4 3 ´ K Q

™ A Q 7 6 4 3 ™ 6 ™ 5

t K 6 4 t A 4 3 t A K J 8 7 4

® A J ® A K J 10 7 4 ® Q J 5 3

Hand 1 is a classic example of a 'bad 15'. It has a

mediocre suit with terrible intermediate cards and

two feeble jacks alongside a dull 6-3-2-2 shape. A 2™

bid is more than enough and there is no danger of

missing game if partner passes.

Hand 2 on the other hand is brimming with

playing strength. The spade holding makes game

quite likely, the club suit is self-supporting and the

NO JUNIOR TEACH-IN

English Bridge Education and

Development has decided that it

will not be holding the 2016

Junior Teach-In. A number of the

regular teachers are involved with

other events over the summer,

making it impossible to ind a date

when the usual high level of

teaching and competitions can

be provided.

The event will return in 2017.

Index

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