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April 2016 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

In Memoriam

In Memoriam

and 2000 and the Burlington Cup in the Autumn

Congress in 1980. He also achieved notable second

places at pairs in the Autumn Congress Two Stars

Pairs in 1979 and the National Pairs in 1983.

He had many interests other than bridge. In

particular, he received international recognition as a

postal historian and was a keen follower of cricket.

DICK GREEN (Essex): The Essex Bridge Association

is sad to report the death of Richard (Dick) Green,

a long time member and current Vice President.

Dick joined the Association in 1958 and soon

made his mark at the table and on the

administrative side. With Keith Stanley, Gerard

Faulkner and Mike Hall county competitions were

won, as well as national events - The Field Cup, The

Committee Cup and an international competition

in Holland.

Dick became auditor to the EBU through the

company he worked for, and an Essex County

delegate. Eventually he became the longest serving

Essex Chairman, retiring in 2010.

NIGEL LAVILLE (Worcs): Nigel was a long standing

member of the county association for over forty

years. As a competitor he was polite and always

scrupulously fair and won all the county events for

which he was eligible, including the Championship

Teams seven times and the Championship Pairs in

two consecutive years. He also served on the

County Committee, including a term as Chairman.

PETER MOHAN (Beds): Peter Mohan's enduring

legacy to Bedfordshire bridge was his founding

(with Ann Pillinger) of PM Bridge, a club which

offers bridge and lunch twice a month, unique in

the County.

Apart from bridge, Peter's other addiction from

an early age was carp fishing. Born in 1930 he left

school at 16, worked on a market garden near

Chichester for three years, did his National Service

in the RAF (where he learnt bridge) and then

trained as a teacher. After schools in Oxfordshire

and Devon, he joined the British School in

Montevideo where he became Headmaster of the

Junior School.

He returned to England to teach in Bristol but

gave up that career in 1970 to write. This was

supported by part-time jobs successively with the

National Anglers Council, the Avon and Bristol

Federation of Boys' Clubs and as General Editor of

Beekay Publishers.

ALAN JEFFERY (Sussex): Worthing Bridge Club's

President, Alan Jeffery, has died at the age of 101.

His consummate skill at the bridge table, displayed

until just a few weeks ago, reflected the fact that he

honed his game on the London high stakes rubber

bridge circuit in the 1950s, alongside running a

highly successful bookmaking business. He moved

to Worthing on retirement in 1980 and became a

qualified duplicate bridge teacher. One of his

regular partners, Ken Shillam, writes, 'Alan was an

absolutely outstanding bridge player and even at

101 years was without doubt the best player at

Worthing. Many people have benefitted from his

series of bridge lessons and can testify on his

teaching skills and general bridge wisdom. He was

tolerant of his partner's shortcomings and displayed

an absence of swagger or bravado about his

superior moves.'

GEOFF SWANN (Leics): It is with great sadness that

the LCBA has to announce the death of Geoff

Swann after an extended period of ill health. Geoff

was the LCBA Fixture Secretary and responsible for

the organisation of the County Teams from 1982 to

1987, during which time the First team won the

Dawes Trophy. He and his wife, Barbara, competed

regularly for the county teams and in local

competitions and they were members of winning

teams in the Leicestershire Cup and the Stanley

Trophy (Swiss Teams) events. A full obituary can be

found on the LCBA website.

JACK THOMPSON (Devon): Jack has died after a short

illness. He was a long term member of Plymouth

Bridge Club as well as serving on their committee

and was also Treasurer of Devon's West Section. He

will be greatly missed and our thoughts and prayers

go to Jenny and their family. r

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