Page 0043

WHILE searching for additional ideas for my short

series of articles 'Bridge in Literature' in English

Bridge, I was struck by the surprising number of

books that do in fact refer to bridge one way or

another. So to end the series, here's a quiz.

Twelve quotes from works of literature - simply

identify the book and the author for 5 points each.

In the tradition of club duplicate, consider it a game

of twelve rounds, two 'boards' per round, so top

score is 120. Answers on page 52-53.

Be warned, this is not an easy quiz. There's 40 easy

marks for those who read my previous articles (the

duplicate equivalent of 30% 'for turning up'), but

I'd rate a score of 85 or more as pretty impressive,

pushing you above the magic 70% mark.

1. Without waiting for Meyer to play he followed

it, deliberately, with the 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, and the two

winning clubs.

Then he spoke. 'That's all, Drax,' he said quietly,

and sat slowly back in his chair.

2. 'A grand game of bridge, Mistress Mapp,' said

the Padre. 'Ah, wee wifie's callin' for me. Au

reservoir.'

3. 'The fact is, I've played cards a good deal -

bridge; the women all do it; girls too - it's

expected. Sometimes I've won - won a good deal

- but lately I've been unlucky - and of course

such debts can't be paid off gradually --'

4. 'Nine of hearts,' my uncle would say, and I'd set

the ™9 on the table. 'Queen of clubs,' and I'd lay

down the ®Q. He never once forgot what cards

he held.

5. There were bridge classes two nights a week in

the old WVS hall. The fee of one and sixpence a

night meant that only respectable people would

attend, and it included tea and biscuits.

Elizabeth enrolled Father and herself as soon as

she saw the poster. […]

Aunt Eileen would have approved of her being

43

February 2015 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

kind to Father but only wealthy protestant

people like the Grays played bridge in Kilgarret.

6. 'Do you play Vanderbilt or Culbertson?' she

asked her.

'I have no conventions,' Lena answered in a

happy-go-lucky way. 'I play by the light of

nature.'

'I play strict Culbertson,' said Arrow acidly.

7. Sir Reuben Hergesheimer was an excellent

bridge player. Both he and Minnie often played

for very high stakes; there was no one else in the

party who was in their class.

8. 'One club.' I noticed that there was a curiously

lilting emphasis on the word 'one,' the first part

of the word drawn out long.

'Ace queen of clubs,' the girl replied wearily.

'King jack of spades. No hearts, and ace jack of

diamonds.'

9. 'I can't think why you people don't learn

contract,' said Agnes, who was already dealing.

'Now then, Lady Wraye, you do play one club,

don't you?'

Mandy […] thought enviously of her husband

playing whist, and even of the vicar playing

auction. 'Oh yes,' she said bravely. 'I love one

club.'

10. The King choked, Soveral sighed, Mr Franklin

gathered in the trick, played his nine of

diamonds, and Mrs Keppel emitted a most

realistic squeal of dismay as she faced her queen

of clubs.

11. 'Barbara, what system do you prefer? Italian?'

Her eyes widened. 'The only Italian I know is

vermouth, Mr Farnham. I play Goren. Nothing

fancy, I just try to go by the book.'

12. 'Je crois bien − a Grand Slam Vulnerable doubled.

It causes the emotions that! Me, I admit it, I have

not the nerve to go for the slams.' r

Bridge in Literature

Bridge in Literature by Dave Simmons

Quotations Quiz

Index

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