Page 0047

47

February 2015 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

NEW LEADS QUIZ: PAGE 27

NEW LEADS QUIZ: PAGE 27

ruffs before trumps are drawn and clubs run.

Remember that your holdings in both these suits are

rather ominous, suggesting that any honours part ner

does have are short and will drop easily.

(b) ´K: 5 marks. Slightly better in that you can

probably hold the lead with this and should know

what to do at trick two. However, there is only one

major chance of beating the contract and this is not

it.

(c) ™3: 6 marks. I actually prefer this to any spade.

It is possible that leading trumps at all oppor tunities

(i.e. when you get in with a spade) may

mean that declarer cannot ruff enough spades to

come to ten tricks and your heart length may just

prove enough of an irritation. This requires some

very specific holdings in the other hands, though.

Surely the most likely way to beat the contract is:

(d) t2: 10 marks. You have a weak hand with a

singleton, so why not lead it and hope for some

ruffs? Pretty much all you need for this is partner to

hold two aces.

HHHHHH

West North East South

1NT

Pass 3NT All Pass

Choose from: (a) ´3; (b) a heart; (c) t5; (d) ®10.

These auctions are always difficult to lead against

because you don't know whether it is right to be

active (dummy coming down with a long minor) or

passive (dummy coming down with a flat 12-13

count). This is yet another reason why experts tend

to avoid invitational sequences if possible.

(a) ´3: 10 marks. Well, I am a big fan of fourth

highest so that gets the 10 marks from me. However,

many experts would strongly disagree with me and

would consider this a poor lead. They would lead . . .

(b) A heart: 9 marks. A passive lead, hoping to give

nothing away with an outside shot at hitting

partner's suit. The hope is that not giving tricks

away will mean the contract will go off naturally.

Also if partner has (say) ´A-x-x-x, that is still only

four tricks, so you need one more. When partner

Hand 3

´ K J 7 3

™ 8 7 5

t K J 8 5

® 10 6

wins his trick, he may be able to work out that a

switch to spades is necessary.

(c) t5: 6 marks. Considerably worse than either

major in my view, simply because North has shown

no interest in the majors and therefore is bound to

have length in the minors.

(d) ®10: 2 marks. This lead, attempting to find

partner's suit and/or be passive is the worst of all

leads and is actually quite dangerous. Firstly, as

stated above, dummy is liable to have length in the

minors, and secondly you could easily carve up the

combined partnership holding by leading the ten.

Think of dummy coming down with ®K-J-x-x and

partner having ®Q-x-x, for example. r

Easter Festival

of Bridge

3 - 6 April 2015

Royal National Hotel, London

The event includes Stratified Teams,

Flighted Swiss Pairs and Championship

Pairs (in which points will be awarded for

the Player of the Year Championship).

There is also a 'Really Easy Afternoon'

for newcomers to tournament bridge.comps@ebu.co.uknquiries: EBU Comps Dept

( 01296 317 203 / 219

or 8 comps@ebu.co.uk

and

Northern

Easter Festival

3 - 5 April 2015

Craiglands Hotel, Ilkley

The event is run by the Yorkshire CBA

stuart@svd1.ukhe EBU and includes Mixed,

Open and Swiss Pairs, and Swiss Teams

Entries / enquiries: Stuart Davies

( 01274 598 408 8 stuart@svd1.uk

Greenpointed

events

Blue

points

Green

points

Blue

points

Index

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