Page 0015

Page 14 AUGUST 2018 | RETAILERS FORUM MAGAZINE

For Late-Breaking Industry News Visit: www.retailersforum.com

If It Affects Retailing We Report On It!

Back-To-School Shopping Gets Slower Start

BY this time of the season the typical back-to-school parent is almost finished with their shopping.

However, this year it appears that while more parents started earlier this year than last, there is still plenty of

shopping to do as they prepare their children for the new school season.

AS of our press time, a recent survey indicated that the average family with children in grades K-12 had

completed only 45% of their shopping thus far. That is down from last year's numbers.

PARENTS this year have been taking longer to finish buying the supplies and clothing that their kids will

need for school.

MANY surveyed still need to buy basic supplies like pencils and paper, up from 77 percent last year,

followed by 75 percent who needed to buy apparel and shoes for their kids.

THE common thread of all the slower shoppers is that they are leveraging in-store promotions, watching

for newspaper inserts and special discount deals to encourage them to finish up their shopping. Over 43% of

those surveyed were influenced by coupons and specials.

SIMILAR to years past, many big ticket items are being required on supply lists of needed items. This

includes computers and laptops so many shoppers are waiting for the best pricing and deals on those items.

WHEN it comes to back-to-college purchasers 41% of shoppers said they will be buying online, with the

balance shopping at department and discount stores. Almost half of the buyers said they were waiting for

discounts and coupons as well as in-store promotions to save the money money.

What Trade War?

WE are or are not in a trade war depending on who you speak to or what news network you watch. If we

do end up in a trade war the loser will probably be the American family who will be caught in the middle. As

trade tensions between the US and rest of the world escalate, expect to take a hit at the cash register.

IN latest news the tariffs will continue on flat screens, solar panels, household appliances. What is going

to happen is that the retaliation will effect consumers around the world, including here in the United States.

WHILE in the long run straightening out the unfair trade practices of the past will hopefully make sense and

pay off, the short term will bring some pain for both businesses and that pain will trickle down to consumers.

COMPANIES in the US who are dependent on imported aluminum and steel, for cars, appliamces, canned

food or beverages, will have to absorb the higher costs. What this typically comes down to is that companies

will lay off workers or have price hikes on the effected products.

ON the flip side, if other countries decide to purchase fewer products from the US, like orange juice for

example, because of the higher costs as a result of the tariffs, that may mean mor einventory and slower

sales for farmers and producers here, which will cost jobs in the long run as well as create a possibility of

higher pricing to compensate for that.

AT a time when wage growth has been somewhat limited, every dollar counts and price inflation means

fewer dollars consumers will have to spend somewhere else. This price inflation takes a toll on consumer

confidence at a time when Americans have been increasingly optimistic about their financial prospects as

opposed to past years.

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074
  75. Page 0075
  76. Page 0076
  77. Page 0077
  78. Page 0078
  79. Page 0079
  80. Page 0080
  81. Page 0081
  82. Page 0082
  83. Page 0083
  84. Page 0084
  85. Page 0085
  86. Page 0086
  87. Page 0087
  88. Page 0088
  89. Page 0089
  90. Page 0090
  91. Page 0091
  92. Page 0092
  93. Page 0093
  94. Page 0094
  95. Page 0095
  96. Page 0096
  97. Page 0097
  98. Page 0098
  99. Page 0099
  100. Page 0100
  101. Page 0101
  102. Page 0102
  103. Page 0103
  104. Page 0104
  105. Page 0105
  106. Page 0106
  107. Page 0107
  108. Page 0108

powered by PageTiger