Page 0043

Responder’s

REALLY EASY BRIDGE

rebid

ONE of the areas where bidding can be Hand 1. You should rebid 2™. This is

tricky is when responder is making a called a ‘preference bid’, telling partner

rebid. Let us look at some hands. that you do not have many points but that

June Booty

you prefer his hearts to his diamonds.

HHHHH Although you are not keen on either suit,

partner’s longest suit is hearts and he has points for game. By bidding 3™ you are

With each of the hands below your at least five of them (you know this inviting partner to bid game if he is good

partner opened with 1™, you responded because partner has denied holding a for his rebid (about 14 or 15 points) and

with 1´ and partner rebid with 2t. What balanced hand as he has neither opened to pass if he is not (about 12 or 13).

should your rebid be? nor rebid in no-trumps). You also know

that partner has a weak hand (probably no Hand 5. You should rebid 4™. This time

more than 15 points) and therefore you you know that your side has an eight-card

Hand 1 Hand 2 would like your partnership to stop bid- major fit and sufficient points for game.

´ KJ984 ´ K Q 10 9 7 5 ding as soon as possible. A preference bid

™ 32 ™ 92 is a closing bid telling partner to pass. Hand 6. Your rebid should be 2NT. This

t J8 t 98 shows a hand with somewhere between a

® Q754 ® Q97 Hand 2. You should rebid 2´. This is also good 10 points and a poor 12. It also

a sign off, as partner has shown you two shows some values in the unbid suit (clubs

Hand 3 Hand 4 suits, both of which you have chosen to in this instance). Partner can take one of

´ AJ94 ´ K872 ignore, instead insisting on your own suit. many actions now, the most frequent of

™ 973 ™ AJ2 When this occurs at the two level, it is which are to pass with about 12 or 13

t 10 8 2 t 983 telling partner that you have at least six points and to raise to 3NT with about 14

® Q42 ® K76 cards in that suit and very few points, and or 15.

again it is a closing bid.

Hand 5 Hand 6 Hand 7. You should bid 3NT, again show-

´ KJ94 ´ KQ52 Hand 3. You should again bid 2™. This is ing values in the club suit but this time

™ A52 ™ 32 the same concept as Hand 1, except that having sufficient points to commit your

t 10 8 2 t J83 this time you do like partner’s suit. You do side to a game.

® AQ4 ® AQ76 not have enough points to consider game

though, so close the auction at the two

Hand 7 level. Summary

´ QJ94

™ K2 Hand 4. You should bid 3™ as again you As a responder making a second bid

t 10 8 2 have three card support for partner’s five- you will have a lot of information

® AKQ2 card suit, but this time you are not sure about partner’s hand. At this point

whether your partnership has sufficient you can take several actions such as:

• Making a ‘sign off ’ (a closing bid)

CROCKFORD’S FINAL 2010 if you know where your side

should play.

TOP places in the eight-team final for the Crockford’s Cup, England’s premier teams • Inviting partner to game if you

of four competition, went to: are unsure whether you have

1. Janet De Botton, Artur Malinowski, Andrew McIntosh, Nick Sandqvist, Jason and sufficient points or not.

Justin Hackett. • Committing your side to play in

2. Ian Draper, Anne and Neil Rosen, Martin Jones, Gerald and Stuart Tredinnick. an eight-card major fit if one has

3. Graham Osborne & Frances Hinden, Jeffrey Allerton & Peter Lee. been identified.

The Plate competition was won by Andy and Cathy Smith, Ralph Smith and Steve

• Suggesting playing in no-trumps

if all suits appear to be covered. r

Tomlinson, ahead of Peter Law, Clive Cubitt, David Kendrick and Malcolm Lewis.

www.ebu.co.uk August 2010 English Bridge 43

Index

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