Page 0055

LEADS

PRIZEQ U I Z

PRIZE LEADS QUIZ

makers of playing cards since 1824

www.piatnik.co.uk QUIZ

( 020 8661 8866

OPENING leads are often subjective and virtually any

opening lead can be successful some of the time. However,

bridge is in many ways a game of percentages and therefore

certain leads will gain more often than others. In each issue

you will be given three hands and the bidding on each, and

you are asked to choose your opening leads. Suggestions

and markings will be in the next issue. In each example you

are on lead as West.

Paul Hackett

Music and Opera have always been synony-

W N E S

mous with Vienna, home of the world famous

Hand 1 1t

Piatnik Playing Cards. It was their love of the

performing arts which inspired a new collec- ´ AKJ987 3♣ 3NT 4´ 5t

tion of Bridge Cards. The ‘Overture’ pack from ™ AJ865 5´ 6t End

this collection is the prize on offer in our series t Void

♣ 95 3♣ = Both majors, W N E S

of quizzes set by Paul Hackett. For more Hand 3

constructive 2´

information on the new Piatnik cards please ´ 76 Pass 2NT 3™ 4´

visit www.gibsonsgames.co.uk. ™ Q 10 7 5 4 5™ 5´ End

There are three categories in our competi- t 10 6 5

tion: up to and including Master; up to and ♣ 754 2´ = Weak, 5-10 points

including Regional Master; and those with W N E S 2NT = Enquiry

higher ranking. Please indicate on the top left- Hand 2 1´ 4´ = Maximum, with a

hand corner of the envelope, or in the e-mail ´ J 10 9 4 Pass 1NT Pass 3♣ singleton heart

subject line, the category for which you are ™ A Q 10 4 Pass 3´ Pass 4´

entering. The first correct entry in each t 10 9 6 4

category out of a hat will win the prize. ♣ J 3♣ = Natural and game

The Editor’s decision is final. forcing

Entries to the Editor, 23 Erleigh Road, Reading RG1 5LR, or e-mail elena@ebu.co.uk by August 20th, 2010.

Please make sure you include your full postal address even if entering by e-mail.

ANSWERS TO JUNE OPENING LEADS QUIZ

W N E S It sounds as though the opponents may have W N E S

´ A65 3NT reached game on minimum values. You are ´ 10 4 2 1NT

™ K 10 7 6 4 End sitting over declarer with the spades and there is ™ J 10 9 7 Pass 3NT Dble End

t Q J 10 4 *Solid minor with no more an inference that partner has the diamonds t Q 10 8 7

♣ 6 than one stop outside stopped so declarer may well be playing on a ♣ 65 ´2 (10); ´10 (8); ™J (4);

cross-ruff. Although it looks unusual to lead a t 7 (2).

´A (10); t Q (5); ™6/™4 (3); ´5/™K (1). trump from this holding, the trick lost is likely to

come back with interest. The ♣Q is the safe lead. The double of 3NT asks for an unusual lead and

The classical lead against the 3NT opener is to The t6 could be right if partner holds the two classically it has always indicated a spade. Here

lead an ace to see the dummy and therefore the minor aces but may well give a trick. there is no reason for not leading the suit partner

´A is the normal choice. A diamond lead could has asked for, especially as the opponents have

work if declarer only had seven club tricks with not used Stayman. The ´2 is better than the ´10

the tA and slow tricks in the majors. Similarly a as it gives partner your spade count. The heart

heart lead may work, but it needs to find more CONGRATULATIONS lead is safe, but after the double may well cost in

specific cards in partner’s suit. terms of tempo. A diamond lead is highly

TO THE WINNERS:

speculative.

Master: Sasha Cooper,

W N E S Oxford

´ A Q 10 8 1´ Regional: Marie Thomson.

™ Q75 Pass 2t Pass 2™

Runfold, Surrey

t 6 Pass 3™* Pass 4™

♣ Q J 10 7 6 End (*non forcing) Open: Andrew Morris,

Horsham, West Sussex

™7/™5 (10); ♣Q (7); t 6 (3).

www.ebu.co.uk August 2010 English Bridge 55

Index

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