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DEC_EB_p30-31 Senior + Quiz Answer 15/11/07 11:39 am Page 31

and follow suit to keep control.

PRIZE PLAY ANSWER

Declarer wins trick four and cashes the

diamond ace, leaving the queen as the threat

card. Now he runs all the trumps, keeping

the club ace-queen in dummy. If the king of

diamonds has not appeared, declarer leads to taking a finesse. If clubs break 4-1

to the ace of clubs at trick twelve, confident with the king not singleton, you will

that the king will drop. The play of cashing Prizes kindly donated by PIATNIK, need four entries to dummy – three to

the ace of diamonds is known as a Vienna makers of playing cards since 1824 take ruffs and one to get back to the long

Coup, and was first recognised back in the card. This means you must time the play

days before the invention of bridge when QUIZ master Julian Pottage gives his view carefully.

Whist ruled the roost. of the best line of play in our October Cash the ♣A and ruff a club high. If

competition and awards prizes in three all follow, you can draw trumps and set

The Double Squeeze categories. up the clubs with ease: you need only

two more entries to dummy, which you

Then there is the Double Squeeze. have with the ♦A and ♠K. In practice,

♠ AK43 West shows out.

♥ 4 You return to dummy with the ♦A

♦ A

and ruff another club high. You then

♠ J

♣ AQ97642

♥ — ruff the winning ♦K in dummy. This

♠ Q J 10 7 ♠96

♦ J8 ♥ 865 N ♥32 allows you to take a third club ruff with

W E

♣ — ♦ Q 10 8 6 3 S ♦J9742 a high trump. Finally, you draw trumps

♠ Q ♠ — ♣ J ♣ K 10 8 5 and cross to the ♠K to cash a long club.

♥ — N ♥ — ♠852 You would be very unlucky to go down

W E

♦ 10 2 S ♦ 94 ♥ A K Q J 10 9 7 with this line.

♣ — ♣ K ♦K5

♠ — ♣3

♥ 7 Congratulations to the winners:

♦ 3 County: Sylvia Palmer, Shirley,

♣ J YOU play in 7♥ after an uncontested Solihull

auction.

West leads the ♠Q, you play the ace Regional: Matthew Kiggins,

Sheffield

Declarer, in a no-trump contract, cashes the from dummy and East follows.

seven of hearts and West is squeezed out of You have twelve top tricks. The obvious Open: Malcolm Young,

place for the thirteenth trick is in clubs, Allestree, Derby

one of his diamonds so as to keep the spade

guard. The spade jack has done its work with ruffing the suit good far preferable

now, so is pitched from the dummy and the

spotlight turns to East. He must keep the NEW QUIZ

club king, so is also forced to discard a

This month’s new Play Quiz is featured on page 21.

diamond. Declarer takes the last two tricks

with the jack and eight of diamonds.

Paul Soloway 1941 – 2007

PAUL SOLOWAY of Seattle, USA, who has died aged 66, was one of the world’s leading

bridge-players. He won the Bermuda Bowl, the World Open Teams’ title, on five occasions,

and took silver in two Bermuda Bowls and two Olympiads.

Soloway learned bridge at college, and six months after graduating made bridge his full-time

career. In 1971 he became a member of the ‘Aces’, the leading professional team in the USA.

World titles in 1976, 1977 and 1979 were followed by a fallow period, but in 1998 he joined

Photo: Ron Tacchi

the USA’s top team, led by Nick Nickell, replacing Bobby Wolff as partner to the world

number one, Bob Hamman. This led to further Bermuda Bowl titles in 1999 and 2003.

Soloway was America’s leading master-point holder having won more than two dozen

national team titles, the most recent being this summer’s Spingold. At the time of his death

his master-point total of 65,500 was more than 6,000 ahead of the next on the list.

Soloway was due to be in the Nickell team for the World Championships last October in

Shanghai but his ill health prevented him competing. Without him the team was eliminated at the end of the qualifying

round robin, not reaching the quarter-finals.

Paul Soloway left a widow, Pam. (Patrick Jourdain)

www.ebu.co.uk December 2007 English Bridge 31

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