Page 0015

In trumps do not lead high from a doubleton

unless it is top of a sequence.

THIS is Part 1 of a two-part article. Next time, I will

look at some exceptions and leading from three (or

more) trumps.

When leading against a suit contract most of us

lead high from a doubleton, middle from three

small and fourth best from length. The reason for

this is so that partner has some chance to work out

the count in the suit, particularly if you might be

ruffing. However, when you lead a trump your

length will not be important to partner and in any

case it will become apparent pretty quickly.

In a recent pairs event my partner was sitting East

with both sides vulnerable. This was the auction:

West North East South

Pass Pass 1® Pass

Pass Dble Pass 2´

All Pass

In third seat, after two passes, he opened 1® (we

were playing a strong no-trump), the next player

passed, I passed and North, a passed hand, reopened

with a double. South jumped to 2´, ending the

auction. I led the ten of spades and this is what

partner could see:

´ K Q 3

™ K J 7

t Q 8 7 4 3

® 8 4

´ A J 2

™ A 5 4

t J 6 2

® K 10 9 3

Declarer called for the king of spades from dummy

15

June 2015 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

and after some thought partner decided to duck,

hoping that I would get in to play another trump

through.

Unfortunately declarer simply took a club finesse,

forced his way to dummy with a heart and

eventually took another club finesse, cashed his ®A

and then ruffed his fourth club in dummy, only

losing three tricks - the heart ace and ace-jack of

spades - for +170 (about average).

The full deal was: ´ K Q 3

™ K J 7

t Q 8 7 4 3

® 8 4

´ 10 9 ´ A J 2

™ 10 9 6 3 ™ A 5 4

t K 10 9 5 t J 6 2

® 7 5 2 ® K 10 9 3

´ 8 7 6 5 4

™ Q 8 2

t A

® A Q J 6

At the end of the hand I pointed out that a trump

return at trick two would have held declarer to nine

tricks (a great score for our side), since partner can

draw dummy's last trump when in with the heart

ace. My partner said: 'But how do I know you have

the nine of spades?'

I pointed out that I would always lead my lowest

trump, except with a sequence. So when I led the

ten, I must also have the nine. With the ten of

trumps and a small one I would lead low (or more

likely not lead a trump at all since 10-x is a

dangerous lead). I could hardly have a singleton

spade since that would give declarer six spades and

opening values yet he passed over 1®.

Despite this tip, there are times when it can be a

good idea to lead a higher trump, as a message to

partner; that is what I will explain next time . . . r

N

W E

S

Leading Trumps (Part I) by David Gold

Bridge TipsBridge Tips

click

link

N E

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072