Page 0027

promote? All is lost on this hand (declarer is surely

destined to make five Spade tricks) unless that ´J is

a singleton in which case you will make a trick by

not covering.

HHHHH

Now, these are relatively simple examples. The way

you should be thinking as you defend is: 'Do I have

a card that might be promoted if I cover?' If the

answer is no, then ask yourself if it is possible that

partner can have a promotable (is that a word?)

card. If there is nothing to promote, then don't

cover.

What you don't want to happen is to be per petually

caught out in this situation:

Layout 6 ´ A 6 5 2

´ Q 8 4 ´ 7 3

´ K J 10 9

Suppose spades are trumps and declarer is fishing

for the queen. Many declarers will try their luck by

leading the ´J from hand trying to tempt West into

an injudicious (and fatally revealing) cover. What

happens in practice is if West plays low non chalantly

on the ´J, declarer plays dummy's ace and

takes the finesse against East, assuming that West

would have covered had he held the ´Q.

Let's look more deeply at this from West's

perspective. If spades are trumps you can assume

that South has (at least) four. That leaves East with

one or two spades. What card(s) could he have that

would be promoted if you were to cover the ´J? The

´K? Well, that's going to make anyway if you don't

cover. Note that covering would be more than a

little embarrassing should the layout prove to be:

Layout 7 ´ A 6 5 2

´ Q 8 4 ´ K

´ J 10 9 7 3

Quite humiliating to make no tricks at all in this

position . . . Going back to Layout 6. If you play low

smoothly on declarer's lead of the ´J and South

does get it wrong (by playing the ´A and taking the

finesse against East), you might just see him eye you

with a greater respect. r

27

June 2015 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

ELIZABETH PHILLIPS

I WAS extremely saddened

to hear of the

death of Liz Phillips on

Tuesday 17th March

from bronchopneumonia

at age 92.

She had been a friend

for many years, and I

had enjoyed playing with her as a partner

and team-member in numerous events. She

was a strong and formidable bridge player,

an aggressive but sound bidder, and an excellent

card player with very good powers

of concentration. She retained an extremely

sharp mind with no loss of ability in her

later years.

We won the Lady Rose Cup (main Surrey

teams of four event) four years running between

2008 and 2011 (Liz playing with Bob

McRobert), on one occasion coming back

from a huge early deficit against a team including

three internationals. Together we

won the Surrey Mixed Pairs three years

running about that time. Even last year, we

came second.

Liz had a number of successes at national

level, and represented the English ladies on

various occasions. Her successes included

three wins in the National Women's Pairs,

a win in the National Women's Teams, a

win in the National Inter-Club Knockout,

and a win in the Garden Cities Trophy. The

last two wins were representing the Mayfield

Club, currently in Tadworth. She had

uncountable successes at the Mayfield, far

too many to list.

Liz also, in 1987, received the Dimmie

Fleming award for services to bridge.

We shared a common interest in sport,

and I discovered that she had played golf at

women's county level, and been an excellent

tennis player and cricketer. Her sporting

prowess was perhaps no accident, as

her father had opened the batting for

Hampshire with the legendary C.B. Fry just

before World War I.

I will miss her.

(Peter Lee)

N

W E

S

N

W E

S

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072