Page 0028

We thank Andrew Robson

and The Times for kind

permission to reprint these

articles. Andrew's Times

articles are available online at

www.thetimes.co.uk

WHY are fewer and fewer playing

in many duplicate bridge clubs -

whilst the game is growing in

popularity at a social level?

Online bridge is undoubtedly

taking people away, but the fact

that friendly, welcoming

duplicate clubs are all thriving

points to a different reason. I fear

that a few regular duplicate

players put newer players off by

their rude, officious, critical, even

intimidating behaviour. The

chasm of difference from the

encouraging classroom is too

much for many. They quickly

back off and play with their

friends. Lost to duplicate bridge.

Forever.

I'm far from alone in thinking

this. Fellow bridge teacher Harold

Schogger has asked me to tackle

this subject and so over three days

I will devote my Times column to

education and reform.

Experienced duplicate players

should be welcoming new players

to the club, not frightening them

away. At my club I operate a zero

tolerance rule: no bad behaviour

of any sort is allowed. Ever. You

only takes one bad experience to

put a new player off for life.

Ethics Quiz

Now here's a quiz. Which of these

is allowed and which is not

allowed:

A. To open 1NT (ostensibly

12-14) when holding 11

points?

B. To bid after your partner

has hesitated?

C. To hesitate when you have

a singleton?

A. Perfectly allowed. If you decide

that your 11 looks like 12, open

1NT. If your opponents tell you

that you're cheating, they're

completely wrong and totally

missing the point. High-card

points are only a guide to

bidding, no more.

B. Allowed, but only if you were

going to bid anyway. If the

opponents believe you have bid

based on partner's pause rather

than your hand, they are entitled

to call the director. However (a)

they should give new players lots

of leeway here and (b) if they do

feel the director should be called,

they should do so politely and

gently.

Don't shout 'DIRECTOR!' Say

to the opponents: 'Would you

mind awfully if I asked the

director to come over?' before

28 English Bridge June 2015 www.ebu.co.uk

The EBU Guide to

Good Behaviour at

Bridge

• Greet others in a friendly

manner prior to start of

play on each round.

• Be a good 'host' or 'guest'

at the table.

• Make your convention

card readily available to

your opponents and fill it

out completely.

• Make bridge enjoyable for

yourself, partner and op ponents.

• Give credit when oppo nents

make a good bid or

play.

• Take care of your per sonal

grooming.

• Ensure that your mobile

phone is turned off.

• Enjoy the company as

well as the game.

Please call the director if

you think you may have

been affected by bad

behaviour. You will be

helping others as well as

yourselves.

Do Your Bit for Bridge

Andrew Robson reminds us of the need for good behaviour at the bridge table

Best Behaviour @ Bridge

Best Behaviour @ Bridge

click

link

should greet your opponents with

a cheery hello, smile a lot and

thank them when you finish the

round. I know I'm largely

preaching to the converted. But it

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