Page 0049

However, if a heart lead was right you will need a

sympathetic partner to avoid comments like: 'I

suppose if I had opened 3® you would have led a

heart. . .'

(c) t2: 1 mark. Giving away your trump trick. No

thanks!

(d) ®6: 10 marks. This is just my choice for the

reasons given above. At the table this was rather

cruelly the winner. Declarer had:

´AK ™AK tAKQ10xxx ®xx

and dummy was 5-2-1-5 with ´Q and ®A-Q, so

declarer has twelve tricks but cannot get at them on

a club lead. I think this is all quite close (apart from

a diamond!) so have marked accordingly.

HHHHHH

West North East South

1NT1

Pass 2®2 Pass 2t3

Pass 3NT All Pass

1 12-14; 2 Stayman; 3 No major.

Choose from: (a) ´J; (b) ™8; (c) a diamond; (d) a

club.

This problem was sent to me by Manchester player

and partner Gary Hyett, and comes from the

English Premier League. We have a fairly unap petis ing

collection to lead from. What is the best of a bad

lot?

(a) ´J: 3 marks. This is a very aggressive lead and

there is no evidence that such a lead is called for.

Every time the spade honours are split between

declarer and dummy you have given a trick away.

Plus it only gains when declarer has both spade

honours and partner has length and can get in twice

to lead through declarer and then cash the long suit.

All very unlikely.

(b) ™8: 10 marks. I am not usually a big fan of

leading short suits but here there is plenty of

evidence that it could be right. Partner has most of

our defensive strength (assuming that you have any

chance of beating the contract) and at least four

hearts. It is also relatively unlikely to give away a

trick (though there are layouts where it will, of

course). Plus it was the winner at the table and was

Hand 3

´ A J 10

™ 8 4

t 10 8 3

® 9 7 6 4 2

49

June 2015 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

found by, among others, multiple world champion

John Holland, so who am I to argue? Partner held:

´xxxx ™AKxxx tQJx ®x

so could just duck the heart lead (they were 3-3)

and wait for you get in with the ace of spades.

(c) A diamond: 5 marks. Neither fish nor fowl, in

my view. It doesn't set up your long suit and it is

unlikely to be partner's.

(d) A club: 8 marks. My second choice, but inferior

just to a heart I think. This is right if you can set up

the clubs and get access with the spade ace, but that

means partner will need some good clubs, which

increases the chance that declarer will simply have

enough winners before you can get in and cash

them. r

REALLY EASY

WEEKEND

26 - 28 June 2015

Marsham Court Hotel, Bournemouth

( 01202 446644

A 'house party' with the emphasis firmly on

play, designed for more experienced novice

players of up to approximately five years

experience. Strictly limited to 36 people.

Bridge fee: £50 payable to EBU.

A bespoke package has been arranged at the

hotel. This includes two nights dinner and

B&B with sandwich lunch on Sunday.

£133 pp sharing (£163 single occupancy).

Book direccomps@ebu.co.ukotel.

EBU Comps Dept ( 01296 317 203 / 219

or email comps@ebu.co.uk Blue

points

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