Page 0065

1. 'Dummy can't revoke'

Dummy can revoke, but Law 64B3 tells us

there is no 'rectification' for such a revoke.

However, as with any other established

revoke, if the non-offending side are

damaged by the revoke then the director can

adjust the score under Law 64C to restore

equity.

2. 'It was in the same breath'

This phrase is not used in the Laws, and the

important thing when correcting an

inadvertent call or designation is not so

much how quickly you do it, but whether or

not you changed your mind. Changes of

mind are not allowed however quickly you

make them.

3. 'The revoke didn't gain a trick'

The revoke laws aren't only there to restore

equity - they also contain a punitive element

to help focus everyone's minds on the most

basic requirement of the game: following

suit. That means that sometimes you will

lose a trick even if your revoke didn't gain

you anything, and conversely you might end

up no better off after your opponent has

revoked - though you should never end up

worse off.

4. 'Play on'

Law 68D tells us that play should cease

whenever a claim or concession is made, so

if your opponent tells you to play on, you

should instead call for the director because

65

June 2015 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

that is the proper way for your opponent to

contest your claim. If you do carry on and

play, that may be considered to provide

evidence in clarification of your claim, so if

you play on and get it wrong you might well

be ruled against even if your claim would

normally have been considered valid.

5. 'Make it good'

The law about insufficient bids is a good deal

more complex than this and you should

always call the director to ensure that both

sides' interests are protected. You may be

able to correct an insufficient bid under Law

25 if it was unintended, but otherwise your

LHO has the option to accept it. If it's not

accepted and was not unintended, then the

complicated and unpopular Law 27 will be

applied. If you have made a premature

replacement before the director has ruled,

you may well find your options limited.

6. 'It's North's responsibility'

Actually, the only thing for which North is

specifically made responsible by the laws is

moving the boards at the end of the round.

When scoring with Bridgemates we have a

regulation that either North or South is

responsible for scoring, and either East or

West is responsible for checking. Otherwise,

a pair which is stationary at a table is

primarily (though not solely) responsible for

proper conditions of play. Don't expect to be

able to blame the other pair if you go to the

wrong table! r

Online ExtraOnline Extra

Common Misconceptions about the Laws

- by Gordon Rainsford

The EBU has created a series of videos to help club Tournament Directors deal

with some of the more commonly occurring situations. Click here to view.

click

link

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072