Page 0018

18 English Bridge June 2019 www.ebu.co.uk

W N E S

1NT Dble Redble 2t

Dble?

W N E S

1NT Dble Redble 2t

Pass Pass Dble?

W N E S

1NT Dble Redble Pass

Pass 2t Pass Pass

Dble All Pass

W

e have looked in quite a lot of detail at

how to deal with various aspects of

opening 1NT. We looked in depth at

defending against it - using Landy or Asptro.

Most of you will be well versed in responding to

1NT, using versions of Stayman and transfers. These

should stand you in good stead and indeed one

huge advantage of playing the weak no trump is

that its frequency produces familiarity with the

responses and continuations - after all it appears

much more frequently than the strong no trump.

Earlier articles have also dealt with coping when

the opponents bid a suit after our 1NT. I

recommend a combination of take-out doubles and

Lebensohl here. This issue's problem arises when

the opponents double our 1NT for penalties!

A. DEALING WITH THE PENALTY DOUBLE -

THE CLASSICAL APPROACH

The standard approach (which I must confess I

normally use myself) is to discard the use of

Stayman and transfers and play all bids as natural

weak take-outs. This leaves a redouble as strength

showing (nine or 10+ HCPs by agreement, I

normally play it as nine).

The idea is to escape into a 5-card suit

immediately, indeed I teach people with 0-3 HCPs

to often run even without the haven of a 5-card suit,

as confidently as possible! Clearly 1NT doubled is

going to be a disaster, whereas by running you often,

though not always, improve matters. You might go

fewer down than in 1NT doubled or even hear them

now bid a contract of their own, so that the

potentially frighteningly large penalty can be

avoided.

After we redouble as responder, it announces the

comfortable balance of the points, effectively stating

that the doubler has picked a bad moment and then

seeks to turn the tables! It is therefore very

important to agree what the next double would be

from either side:

Coping with a penalty double of a Weak No Trump

If you could add one thing . . . by Neil Rosen

My suggestion firstly is to agree that if they run to

2-minor then the auction should be forcing - we

cannot let them play there - we either double them

or continue the bidding to our own contract.

Conversely if they run to 2™/´ the auction should

be non-forcing (this is sensible since we do not want

to double them into game on marginal hands, a

much lesser risk when doubling 2®/t of course).

click

link

My recommendation for the two auctions above

is to play them both as take-out with all subsequent

doubles from either side becoming penalties. I am

totally happy for you to agree them all as penalties

of course - as always the most important thing is

agreeing with your partner. Sitting East:

´ K 7 3 2

™ 9 8

t A J 10 8

® Q 7 4

In the example above East redoubles to show

strength. When North runs to diamonds he makes a

forcing pass. Resist the urge to double 2t as that

would be take-out not penalty. Pass and hope

partner can double. If they had run to 2™ East

would have made a take-out double himself.

B. CLASSICAL APPROACH WHEN THE

OPENER CHOOSES TO REDOUBLE

The opener can also choose to redouble. This

does not say partner you are an idiot and cannot

judge it is simply trying to convey information

without treading on partner's toes.

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074