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June 2019 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

W N E S

1NT Dble Pass Pass

RedbleA Pass 2®A

This is quite rare but can be used to show the

desire to run to a 5-card suit (some limit it to just a

minor). If you think about it (I have - sad huh!) it

is really quite frustrating to be dealt a healthy 8-

count or so, get doubled in 1NT and then hear your

partner remove to their own suit! Grr. How much

nicer for opener to consult by redoubling to show a

suit of their own - responder can now either pass

and play 1NT redoubled or remove. If removing

they always bid 2® to allow the opener to pass with

clubs or convert to their own suit. Therefore:

the 2® bid acts as a relay, asking opener to place the

contract into their known 5-card suit.

3. NON-CLASSIC APPROACH -

A WRIGGLE OF SOME DESCRIPTION

Many choose to play that the use of a natural

redouble is sufficiently rare so as not to bother.

They then play an escape mechanism to attempt to

locate a playable contract rather than the dreaded

1NT doubled!

There are many options on the market - the main

thing is to be on the same wavelength as your

partner. Here's a fairly decent one, called Helvic:

1. Pass demands opener redoubles

W N E S

1NT Dble PassA Pass

RedbleA

W N E S

1NT Dble PassA Pass

RedbleA Pass 2®A Pass

?

W N E S

1NT Dble PassA Pass

RedbleA Pass 2tA Pass

?

W N E S

1NT Dble RedbleA Pass

2®A Pass 2™

East's pass forces the opener to redouble (alerted). It

either shows a willingness to play in 1NT redoubled

or a two suiter hand with non-touching suits,

usually 4-4 in length. This might be clubs and hearts

or diamonds and spades. When the opener

redoubles as requested the responder removes to

the minor, which the opener either passes or gives

preference to the major. If it is your lucky day you

will find an 8-card fit and all will be well. If not at

least a 7-card fit will always be found. So, West will

choose the better contract between 2® and 2™ in

the example below:

In the next auction West will choose between 2t

and 2´:

2. Responder redoubles

This bid is showing a single-suited escape, with 5+

cards in your suit. It is alertable and demands that

opener bids 2®, which will be passed with clubs or

corrected to responder's suit. In the example below

East redoubles to show a single-suited hand, and

corrects 2® to 2™ - a natural weak take-out hand.

3. Bidding a suit after the double

The idea here is that an immediate suit bid shows

the lower of two touching suits (a 2-suited hand).

This is normally 4-4 in length, or a very weak five

card suit, since you can make a 5-card escape via

redouble. Thus,

1NT-(Dble)-2® - shows clubs and diamonds

1NT-(Dble)-2t - shows diamonds and hearts

1NT-(Dble)-2™ - shows hearts and spades

1NT-(Dble)-2´ - shows spades and clubs

We can therefore see that all the combinations of

escape suits can be shown.

A COUPLE OF NOTES OF CAUTION!

First, I can't honestly say that

having to bid 2´ with this hand

fills me with joy, but at least all

the combinations can be

shown.

´ J 7 3 2

™ 9 8

t 8 6 5

® Q 7 4 3

Second, with a 4·3·3·3 shape you have to decide

which lie to tell. Either you decide to treat it as two

4-card suits, or you pretend to have a 5-card suit!

As with everything I'm sure you will find your

results improve if you take on these methods or

indeed something similar. I have never been a fan of

Exit Transfers - they just seem to give good

opponents an extra round of bidding space to

resolve matters: usually in their favour. r

Check out Neil's quiz online, page 69

Index

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