Page 0025

25

June 2019 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

HEATHER'S HINTS

D Plan your entries carefully. One common

example of this is when you are drawing

trumps, you should think about which hand

you may need entries to later on in the play.

D When you need a certain layout of a suit in order

to make your contract, you should play for it.

However when there is a choice, as in the club suit

above where you could play for them to be six-one

or five-two, the opening lead may provide an

additional clue. r

MATCH-POINTS OR CROSS-IMPS ON A CLUB NIGHT?

Robin Barker

P

eter Smith wrote a letter: 'We have been

having (not wholly informed) discussions

in our club as to the relative benefits of

pairs scoring between cross-imps and matchpoints.

It seems there has been an increased

emphasis recently on scoring in cross-imps rather

than match-points. Not sure whether this is now

considered to be a fairer system, leading to a more

accurate assessment of the bridge session.'

Matchpoints is the easiest method for scoring a

pairs competition and is the best understood form

of scoring by the players. But the strategy

with match-point scoring is quite

different from team-of-four

scored by IMPs - bidding

game (or slam) has the

same importance as

making overtricks.

cross-imp scoring was

introduced to try to

add the elements of

IMP strategy to a pairs

competition. At

match-points you get

points depending how

many other scores you

beat. With cross-imps your

points depend on how much

you beat the other scores.

For example, if ten pairs make 2NT=,

you make 2NT+1, and someone makes 3NT=, then

at match-points your score is almost a top (20/22)

but at cross-imps your score is average, 0 IMPs

(10 lots of +1 IMP and 1 score of -10 IMPs). At

match-points, the overtrick is important, at crossimps the game bonus

makes much more difference.

Both methods of scoring are fair: all pairs are

treated the same. But the difference comes on

which way pairs sit on the important boards: deals

where big scores are possible or where some other

pair has a disaster. If the field is of wide-ranging

ability, then match-points can be seen as fairer

because the pairs in contention are less affected by

extreme results between other pairs. If the field is of

similar ability, then cross-imps can offer a more

interesting form of competition. I run a cross-imp

pairs league which has divisions of four or five

tables (scored independently), which allows for

competition amongst groups of similar ability.

Computer scoring has made matchpoint scoring

easy and made other

forms of scoring almost equally

easy. Until recently,

Bridgemates were only

programmed to understand

match-points, and could

only display match-point

percentages. The latest

generation of the

Bridgemate system

understands IMPs and

cross-imps and can display

current scores on the

Bridgemates for a cross-imp

scored competition. This

innovation should make cross-imp

events more appealing and comprehensible

to players who are only used to match-points.

cross-imp scoring can be used when there are a

small number of tables because match-points does

not offer much variety. Many clubs do routinely use

cross-imps when they have few tables because it

permits a greater range of values on each individual

board. The rule at one club is to do this whenever

they have fewer than five tables. r

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074