Page 0047

Candleford Bridge

Tuesday afternoons, 2.15pm

Duplicate & Review Sessions

Buckingham Athletic Sports & Social Club, Bucks

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Cam & Dursley U3A

Tuesday afternoons, 2pm

15-board duplicate with reviews

Dursley Methodist Church, Glos

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Keswick Bridge Club

Tues, gentle duplicate, 7pm, St Herbert's Centre

Thurs, duplicate, 7pm, Keswick Conservative Club

keswick-bridge-club.000webhostapp.com

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™ NEWLY AFFILIATED CLUBS ™ 47

June 2019 English Bridge

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bidding). So, what is best to try and beat this

contract?

(a) ´10: 1 mark. I do not see any case for leading

round into declarer's suit. The ´10 could also be a

useful card in defence.

(b) ™Q: 3 marks. Highly dangerous! Remember

dummy has four hearts. Think of layouts such as

K10xx opposite Axx to see that you have blown the

whole suit.

(c) a diamond: 10 marks. Giving as little away as

possible and letting declarer do their own work.

To be fair it is unlikely this contract is going off,

but this seems the best way to try.

(d) ®6: 3 marks. I do not like this at all. It is

dangerous to lead from suits like this when the

opposition have most of the high cards. Here

declarer has Qx in dummy opposite AK10x….

Nothing beats the hand but the passive diamond

lead holds declarer to their 11 top tricks.

Pairs Bonus: a diamond - 5 marks. Nothing would

persuade me to lead anything other than a

diamond at pairs.

We know nothing about North's hand, but South is

distributional. So, it is likely we need to grab our

tricks before the mice get at them. Forget about

passivity against pre-empts - get at your tricks!

(a) ´A: 9 marks. Close between this and the ™A. This

gives us control in hearts which may be important

in case we need to switch, but I just prefer:

(b) ™A: 10 marks. Best in my view as it allows us to

look at dummy. Depending on what comes down

it might be right to lead another one.

(c) t8: 5 marks. Well it could be right if we have to

set up diamond tricks fast or the even more

unlikely event that we have a diamond ruff, but

really it is between the two aces.

(d) a club: 1 mark. Way, way, too passive and the

fact you have length might see declarer pitching a

few losers on dummy's club winners while you

helpfully follow.

At the table either ace or, irritatingly, a club worked

as you have ´AK, ™A and ®A off the contract. A

diamond lead and it is bye bye to one of declarer's

spade losers.

Pairs Bonus: ™A - 5 marks. My views are

unchanged. Either ace for me but I still just prefer

the ™A r

Choose from: (a) ´A; (b) ™A; (c) t8; (d) a club.

Hand 3

´ A 10 7 6 4

™ A 6

t 8 2

® 9 8 7 4

South West North East

3™ Pass 4™ All Pass

PHIL TOPLEY

Aged 94

Phil was an Oxford graduate and professional

bridge player in the 1950s, winning the Gold Cup

and Tollemache (twice), followed by nine

Camrose appearances. He became a maths teacher

in Staffordshire and continued playing. Roger

Bryant, who co-opted Phil onto his Gold Cup

team, remembers him with great affection: 'Once I

wrote to the organising committee complaining

that my Midlands-based team kept getting drawn

away to distant parts of the country. 'Whoa, that's

a bad move,' said Phil, 'you've got to humour

them, you know.' Next week the draw for the next

round came through the post in a neatly typed

letter informing us that we were away to a team

from Edinburgh. And, handwritten on the

bottom, was: 'Thank you so much for your helpful

feedback.' 'I knew they'd get you,' said Phil, before

typically guffawing with amusement. More details

on www.ebu.co.uk/biographies/phil-topley

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