Page 0050

50 English Bridge June 2019 www.ebu.co.uk

Juniors go for the maximum from a hand

White House Bridge by Shahzaad Natt

E

very March the Dutch Bridge Federation

hosts a junior tournament called the White

House, so named because the venue is a small

white house. This year we were lucky to have

received invitations for two teams. One was

England's U26 (Charlie Bucknell & Dominic Price,

Stephen Kennedy & Tony Ye, Shahzaad Natt & Ben

Norton) and the other was England's U26 Womens

team (Olivia Bailey & Ewa Wieczorek, Laura Covill

& Siyu Ren, India Leeming & Hanna Tuus).

The competition has two qualification stages

followed by a series of knockout matches. The

women's team did not make it through to the

knockouts but after a triumphant victory against

the host nation (in my eyes the tournament

favourites) England U26 were through to the semifinals.

For the first half of the match Ben and I had been

given a rest so we were nervously watching on BBO.

The Danes had taken an early lead when this board

came up and we needed every IMP that was

available:

Opening 3® with such a sterile distribution and

mediocre suit is not my choice vulnerable but it was

the bid selected at the table. Stephen Kennedy

elected to balance with a double in the protective

seat in order to get both the major suits into the

picture. Tony Ye, with a few quick tricks and no

convenient suit to bid, found a pass. The other table

was likely to bid and make 4™, so it was crucial that

the maximum penalty was extracted.

Superficially 3® has only five losers (two spades,

two hearts and one club) which would lead to +200

and a likely 10 IMP loss. Ye led the ´K and

continued with a spade to the 10 and jack. It looked

like North was angling for a spade ruff but Kennedy

cashed the ™A before continuing. West false-carded

with the jack and Ye played the ™8. At this stage I

was kibitzing on BBO and shouting at my phone,

willing Stephen to find the winning defence.

Kennedy reasoned that with ™K1087 Ye would

have played the ™7 to encourage and not the ™8

(reverse attitude). He inferred that West was

concealing that card. Next he cashed the ™Q! This

enabled him to maintain the lead to play a spade,

which West ruffed optimistically with the ®10. Ye

considered his options and correctly discarded a

loser. Had Ye over-ruffed his side would have made

just one trump trick as his remaining clubs would

fall under the ace, queen and nine. Instead, his ®8

was eventually going to grow up and provide a trick.

This careful sequence of play led to a well earned

+500 and only 4 IMPs in the out column.

Unfortunately, despite a fiercely contested battle

and many close moments we were defeated by the

Danes who went on to win. The next day we played

Poland in the third-place play-off. In the

qualification stages Poland had the better of us so

we were keen to get our revenge. I'm glad to say that

we won fairly comfortably to take the bronze medal

overall. A very good result that should stand us in

good stead for the European Junior Teams

Championships in Norway this July. r

Game All. Dealer West.

´ K 8

™ K 10 8

t 9 8 7 5

® A 8 7 4

´ 5 3 ´ Q 10 9 7 2

™ J 7 ™ 6 3 2

t Q 2 t A K 10 3

® K 10 9 6 5 3 2 ® Q

´ A J 6 4

™ A Q 9 5 4

t J 6 4

® J N

W E

S

West North East South

Lahrmann Ye Plejdrup Kennedy

3® Pass Pass Dble

All Pass

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074