diabetes and ketones, diabetic sick day rules, DKA

LIVINGLIVING

One of the types of ketone, acetone,

has a smell that some describe as being

like pear-drops (the sweets). That smell

on your breath (or on the breath of your

child, partner or person you care for) is a

good indication that the person has raised

levels of ketones. There are also some

breath-test ketone products available, but

these may not be as accurate as a blood

test, nor will ketone urine test strips, but

they will give a good indication of whether

ketones are present.

Breath test: Swedish-designed

Ketonix is a reusable class I medical

device that indicates ketones in your

breath, enabling you to measure

throughout the day with no extra costs or

blood samples. There is a Bluetooth and a

USB version, neither of which are cheap.

www.ketonix.com

Urine tests: Good old-fashioned

urine strips to test for ketones. The strips

change colour when dipped in urine,

indicating ketone levels. They are fast,

easy to use and convenient - you could

keep a bottle in the bathroom cabinet, just

in case you need to check on whether or

not you are getting ketotic. You can get

Bayer's original Keto-Diastix (a bottle of 50

strips for about £12.50).

www.farmaline.uk

EDITOR'S COMMENT low carb diets), which encourage the

burning of fat to induce the production of

ketones. Quite frankly this is dangerous

if you have diabetes. You would have to

blood test and ketone test thoughout

and such undertaking, and need to have

a very good understanding of how many

ketones could be considered 'healthy'

(I would argue that only zero ketones

is healthy). Discuss with your careteam

before you undertake any such diet.

- Sue Marshall

This article is based on current medical

advice. Personally, I think that checking

for ketones if over 11mmols sounds

overly cautious, but those are the NHS

guidelines. The points is to know what

ketones are, how they might affect you,

and how to test for them. You might

want to consider having a backup ketone

meter or box of ketostix to hand at home,

particularly if you get ill.

Meamwhile, much fuss about so

called 'keto diets' at the moment (extreme

Other ketone tests

In general, your sick day rules should include:

1. Tell someone. Don't be ill alone. Even if you don't have anyone to look after you, tell

someone if you get sick.

2. Take your meds: Continue taking insulin and/or most diabetes medications - even

if you don't feel like eating. You may need to alter your dose - but check with your

diabetes team first. If you're taking any SGLT2 inhibitors (dapagliflozin, canagliflozin,

empagliflozin), you may need to stop taking them if you can't face eating or drinking - but

contact your diabetes team as soon as you can to discuss this.

3. Keep drinking: Drink lots of unsweetened fluids to stay properly hydrated.

4. Get testing: Test your blood sugar more than you usually do, at least every four hours

- even during the night. Keep a note of your results - time of test, result of test.

5. Keep ketones in check: If your blood sugar is 11mmol/l or more for several hours,

check for ketones (see 'Testing for ketones').

6. Get some energy: If you don't feel like eating, or you feel sick or are struggling

to keep anything down, try to sip a mildly sugary drink or suck glucose tablets or sweets

to give you some energy, but only if your blood glucose is not already high. If you're

vomiting, or unable to keep fluids down get medical help as soon as possible.

Bear in mind you will not be making the best decisions, you are feeling unwell and high

ketones (or low blood sugars) can affect your capacity to make good decisions. Blood

and ketone tests give you facts that can help you make decisions.

Basically, keep taking your insulin, keep testing, keep drinking water. Tell someone.

SICK DAY RULES

Index

  1. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  2. Diabetes UK careline
  3. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information, Sue Marshall
  4. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  5. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  6. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  7. Dexcom CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  8. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  9. Ascensia Contour Next One Diabetes blood test meters
  10. Page 0010
  11. Senseonics Eversense implantable CGM, Roche Diabetes Care, Accu-Chek
  12. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  13. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  14. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  15. OurPath programme, Roche Diabetes Care
  16. diabetes and ketones, diabetic sick day rules, DKA
  17. diabetes and ketones, diabetic sick day rules, DKA
  18. diabetes and ketones, diabetic sick day rules, DKA
  19. diabetes and ketones, diabetic sick day rules, DKA
  20. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  21. Page 0021
  22. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  23. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  24. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  25. Medtronic Minimed 670G insulin pump
  26. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  27. Omnipod Insulet insulin pump with insulin pods
  28. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  29. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  30. Insulin pumps UK 2018
  31. Desang diabetes kitbags
  32. London Medical, London Diabetes Centre, private diabetes clinic
  33. London Medical, London Diabetes Centre, private diabetes clinic
  34. London Medical, London Diabetes Centre, private diabetes clinic
  35. London Medical, London Diabetes Centre, private diabetes clinic
  36. Making Carbs count: Counting carbs for the diabetic diet
  37. Making Carbs count: Counting carbs for the diabetic diet
  38. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  39. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  40. Free diabetes magazine, living with diabetes, the diabetic diet, carb counting

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