Page 0019

www.ebu.co.uk 19

February 2020 English Bridge

The squeeze is all about pressure; playing the last trump; giving the

hapless opponent an impossible discard. Bearing that in mind, contrast

the endings in diagrams A and B, where South must win three more

tricks:

Although it looks bad for West in A, in fact he will survive. For he has

an 'idle card', the queen of clubs, which he can painlessly discard on the

ace of diamonds. He retains both his major suit guards, and the defence

will take two tricks. Not so in (B), a classic squeeze position, in which

West has no answer on the ace of diamonds.

What did you need to do to convert A into B? Answer: you needed to

lose a club earlier. For a squeeze to operate, you need to have one fewer

winner than the number of cards remaining (sometimes referred to as N

minus one, N-1). In B you had two winners and three cards remaining -

perfect; in A you had two winners and four cards - no good. In order to

reach a position whereby you have one fewer winner than the number of

tricks left, you may need to Rectify the Count (lose a trick).

Love All. Dealer South

´ A K 10

™ 5 3 2

t 10 9 8

® K Q 4 2

´ 8 6 4 2 ´ 7 5

™ 10 7 ™ J 9 8 6

t K Q J 3 t 6 4 2

® 10 8 6 ® J 9 7 3

´ Q J 9 3

™ A K Q 4

t A 7 5

® A 5

´ A J

™ 2

t -

® 2

´ K Q ´ 4 3

™ A ™ -

t - t -

® Q ® A K

´ 2

™ K

t A (led)

® 3

N

W E

S

West North East South

2NT

Pass 6NT1 All Pass

1 Perhaps a quantitative bid of 4NT would

suffice.

A February Squeeze . . .

Rectifying the Count click

link

by Andrew Robson

Declaring 6NT on our featured deal, South counted

11 top tricks on West's tK lead. A 3-3 heart split

would give him his slam, but South sought better.

With only 11 winners and 13 tricks, declarer

needed to rectify the count to reach 'N-1'. He

therefore ducked the opening lead (key play).

Winning the queen of diamonds, declarer cashed

his four top spades. On the third, East could chuck

his last diamond, but on the fourth? If declarer had

won the first trick, East would have another 'idle'

diamond, but as it was, he had to discard a heart or

a club. Both would be fatal. Twelve tricks and slam

made. r

The deal is taken from Andrew Robson's

Endplay & Squeeze, one of his series of

invaluable Bridge Lessons books. They are

available from the EBU's

www.bridge-warehouse.co.uk

N

W E

S

´ A J

™ 2

t -

® -

´ K Q ´ 4 3

™ A ™ -

t - t -

® - ® A

´ 2

™ K

t A (led)

® -

N

W E

S

A

B

Index

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