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February 2020 English Bridge

´ 9 7 5 ´ 3

™ A 9 2 ™ Q 10 3

t K Q 10 4 3 t A 8 7 2

® K 6 ® A Q J 7 4

N

W E

S

W N E S

1NT Pass 3´ Pass

4´ Pass 4NT Pass

5™ Pass 6® Pass

6t All Pass

´ 10 5 ´ Q J 6 3

™ A Q 10 2 ™ K J 3

t K J 4 3 t A Q 9 7 4

® Q 7 5 ® 3

N

W E

S

W N E S

1NT Pass 3t Pass

3™ Pass 3´ Pass

4t Pass 4™ All Pass

hearts (you can show the singleton spade but then

there is no way to find a heart fit). Accordingly, the

three level works like this (note that while the 3™

and 3´ bids would be similar to a number of other

partnerships, 3® and 3t is a rare treatment,

probably only played by those who have partnered

me). So after 1NT:

3® Singleton spade and exactly four hearts (any

minor suit shape)

3t At least five diamonds and singleton club

3™ Singleton heart with at least four cards in each

minor, could be 4·1·4·4 shape

3´ Singleton spade with at least four cards in

each minor, denying four hearts

The principles are mostly the same, though over

responder's 3® there are some extra options:

3t Neutral bid, allowing responder to use the

major bids to show 'linked minors'. That is,

3™ to show at least five clubs (for example

1·4·3·5 or 1·4·2·6 shapes), and 3´ to show

at least five diamonds. With 1·4·4·4 shape

responder bids 3NT, 4NT or 5NT to show a

game going hand, slam invite or slam

forcing hand respectively.

3™ Agrees hearts. We operate a simple policy in

much of our system. If you don't bid a suit

you haven't got it. So here, if you want to

play in hearts, you have to bid it straight

away. Over this, responder will raise, or

with a slam try will bid a long minor

naturally.

3´ Good stopper for 3NT, but also slam

suitable. For example

´AQ85 ™K3 tQ104 ®K754

3NT To play

Here are some examples:

East shows both minors over the weak no trump.

West has a huge hand for diamonds, so rather than

simply jumping to 5t, he makes a general slam try

with 4´. East uses 4NT to show some interest (no

suit is agreed yet so 4NT has less use as ace asking).

West might jump to 6t, but in fact his partner is

unlimited so he cuebids his ace of hearts. East has

no interest in a grand slam, so offers 6®, still not

knowing what the trump suit is, which is converted

to 6t.

East shows his singleton club and at least five

diamonds in one single bid. Thereafter, both hands

show their major suits, and then the no trump

opener retreats to 4t, not fancying his ®Q75 stop

opposite a singleton. East sees the opportunity to

offer 4™ in the good 4-3 fit, and there the matter

rests, likely to make ten tricks. Note that East can

offer 4™ because he has the singleton club and three

card heart support, so can ruff clubs in the short

trump hand. 4´ and 4NT would be slam tries by

East, as you would not want to play in a 4-3 spade

fit taking the club ruffs in the four card suit. r

At the Year End Congress in Blackpool the

winners of the Mixed Pairs were Jeff Smith &

Rhona Goldenfield and the winners of the Open

Pairs were Ollie Burgess & Mark Weeks. The Swiss

Pairs was won by John Dearing & Jeremy

Stanforth who finished 3 VPs ahead of Paul De

Weerd & John Large. Jeff & Rhona were victorious

again in the Swiss Teams playing with Jackie Pye &

John Holland. Their team won six out of seven

matches to win by 17 VPs.

BLACKPOOL YEAR END CONGRESS

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