Page 0033

www.ebu.co.uk 33

February 2020 English Bridge

1 3™ was game forcing, so a pass over 4´ must also

be forcing. Opener only has 11 HCP but has a very

suitable hand for partner with Axx trumps, a decent

diamond suit, a singleton and another ace

2 When opener doesn't double, responder will

definitely force to slam, but doesn't know what suit

to play in. 5® is not forcing, even though it shows a

second suit. 5´ however gets the message across: a

slam drive with first round spade control but unsure

what suit to play in.

3 Opener is also unsure which suit to play in - either

diamonds or hearts could be right. (Indeed, on the

actual hand at IMP scoring I would rather play in 6t

than 6™.)

4 Second suit. Responder has already forced to slam

so doesn't mind if this is passed.

5 Opener is less keen on diamonds now that

responder hasn't chosen them, so will choose hearts.

I think it's close whether to bid 6™ or 7™. Even

looking at both hands I'm not sure if 7™ is a good

contract. Indeed, hearing that clubs were 6-1 makes

it likely that 7™ would have gone off in practice, so

I'll stick with six.

'Playing pairs, my partner and I picked up these

hands:

As South I opened 1t.

West bid 2´, stated by his

partner to be strong! How

can my partner let me know

that it must in fact be weak?

In the event he doubled and

East bid 4´. I passed, as did

West. Partner now bid 5®

and East doubled, holding six

clubs. Somewhat confused

and ready to go home, I

passed, and we scored -1100.

I suggested that partner might have bid 3´ on the

first round and 4NT on the second round. He

thought I ought to have taken out into 5™. An

expert opinion would be welcome.'

This is a hard hand to bid, and it's not completely

clear what the best contract is. To be honest, I don't

think the explanation of 'strong' was the major

contributory cause of the disaster, because as you

point out, responder knew at once that wasn't what

the overcaller actually had.

On the first round, I don't think a cue bid of 3´ is

right. There are two common meanings used for

this bid: the most popular is to play it as a very

strong diamond raise (but with 4-card support); the

other is to ask for a spade stop. To be honest, the

simplest call is 3™ which should be natural and

forcing to game with at least five. The negative

double is more suitable for either a more balanced

hand with only four hearts, or a hand which isn't

strong enough to force to game. Having started

with a double, the 5® bid on the next round is

definitely confusing. I would (not very confidently)

expect something like this hand

- a hand which doesn't want to

defend and didn't think it was

strong enough to bid a game

forcing 3® last round, and

wanted to find a heart fit if there was one.

One possible auction with this start is:

´ -

™ K Q x x

t x x

® A J 9 x x x x

Robin Barker looked at the issue of the

mis-explanation on this hand:

North can say nothing during the auction. At

the end of the hand, North can call the

Tournament Director and say that the explanation

he was given does not match the hand held by the

opponent. The TD will investigate by asking

questions of East/West and looking at any system

cards to determine whether they have an

agreement to play strong jump overcalls. If that is

the agreement, then North/South have not been

misinformed about the East/West agreement and

there would be no adjustment because of

misinformation. But in the absence of evidence as

to the agreement, the TD will rule that

North/South were entitled to an explanation that

agrees with West's hand. In this case, North/South

will have to suggest how they would bid differently

with the correct explanation, and the TD can

award an adjusted score if North/South were

damaged by the mistaken explanation. However,

the TD may conclude that the bad score for

North/South was not related to the mistaken

explanation (as Frances suggests above), and there

would be no adjusted score. r

´ -

™ K Q 10 6 5

t A 4 3

® A K Q 5 3

´ A 7 5

™ A 5 4

t K 10 9 6 5 4

® 10

N

W E

S

W N E S

1t

2´ 3™ 4´ Pass1

Pass 5´2 Pass 5NT3

Pass 6®4 Pass 6™5

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070