Page 0044

44 English Bridge February 2020 www.ebu.co.uk

S

ome boards have 'disaster' written all over

them. This deal from the World

Championship Teams in Wuhan was one such

- with every hand played at 24 tables in each of the

Open, Women, Senior and Mixed series, no fewer

than 384 world-class players had a chance to do

something stupid, and many grabbed it with both

hands. At one table, developments were

comparatively normal:

The Way of the Wuhan

Great Bridge Disasters by David Burn

click

link

E/W Game. Dealer East

´ 10 8

™ J 8 6

t -

® J 10 9 8 7 6 4 2

´ A K 9 5 4 ´ Q 7 6 3

™ 10 5 2 ™ K 9 7 4 3

t J 9 3 t 10 7 5

® A 3 ® Q

´ J 2

™ A Q

t A K Q 8 6 4 2

® K 5

N

W E

S

At the other table the auction was not as simple:

E/W Game. Dealer East.

West North East South

Pass 1®1

1´ Pass2 3´ 4t

Pass 5® Pass 5t

Pass 6® All Pass

1 Any strong hand, 2 Any weak hand

E/W Game. Dealer East.

West North East South

Pass 1®1

1´ Dble2 3™3 4t

Pass 5® Pass 5t

Dble All Pass

1 Any strong hand, 2 Any very weak hand,

3 Hearts and spades

When Canada confronted USA1 in the Senior

event, the South player appropriately enough found

an opening bid from a bygone era - 3NT. Nowadays

this is used by many to show a solid minor with no

side ace or king, while others play it to show a fourlevel

minor-suit pre-empt (allowing 4® and 4t to

be used as Texas for hearts and spades respectively).

The cool school employ the bid to show a long solid

major suit, and I have seen it used to show a weak

but very distributional minor two-suiter. Here it

just meant that South thought he could make 3NT,

and North either shared his optimism or had no

way to extricate his side. South could (and did)

actually make 1NT, 100 to East-West.

It may be that North was attempting to comply

with the sound principle of never putting an eightcard

suit down in the dummy - perhaps forgetting

that he was going to have to do this anyway so

might as well have passed 5t. It appeared once

West had failed to double the slam that the board

would be flat, since 6® would lose the obvious three

tricks for 100 to East-West at this table also. But

West, to the wonderment of all, justified his

decision not to double by leading … the three of

clubs.

South beat East's ®Q with the king, cashed three

diamonds to discard two spades from the dummy,

led a second round of trumps and claimed his

contract. Plus 920 and 14 IMPs to Canada. In the

Open series where USA1 confronted the

Netherlands, this was the bidding:

Here North elected not to rescue South from

diamonds, and paid a modest price - the defenders

took two spades, ®A and a club ruff, and a heart in

the endgame when declarer could not reach dummy

for a finesse. 500 to East-West, not a bad result.

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