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February 2018 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

´ K J 8 7 6 ´ Q 5 3

™ A J 10 5 ™ Q 8 7

t Q 3 t K 7 2

® 4 3 ® J 8 6 5

East Hand 1 East Hand 2

´ 8 6 5 ´ A 9 6 2

™ 6 4 2 ™ Q 2

t A 9 7 6 t Q J 9 8 6 5

® A 4 3 ® 8

East Hand 3 East Hand 4

´ J 10 8 6 ´ A 3

™ A 4 ™ Q 8 2

t Q J 5 t Q 10 8 2

® A 8 6 3 ® K Q 10 4

West

´ K Q 9 7 2

™ K J 5 3

t K 4

® 7 5

N

W E

S

Also remember that unless the hand is very wild

and wacky it is normally better to double with 16+

rather than employing Landy.

CONTINUATIONS AFTER A LANDY OVERCALL

Most of the time you simply pick a major -

bidding your best/longest. Sitting South, with:

´ 3 2

™ Q 3 2

t A 7 3 2

® Q 9 3 2

W N E S

1NT 2®1 Pass ?

1 Landy

You should bid 2™. Please note that Landy is not

simply 'defensive Stayman' asking for a 4-card

major. It shows rather than asks about the majors.

THE 2t RESPONSE

This is an excellent way to reach the right partscore.

It usually shows equal preference for the

majors and invites the Landy bidder to nominate

their longer or better major, ensuring that the best

fit will be found - it might only show 2·2, perhaps

3·3 or occasionally 4·4 in the majors:

Assuming West has used 2® Landy to show both

majors after a 1NT opening by South, East can use

2t asking partner to pick the major. If responder

was simply forced to guess they would probably bid

2™ (the lower ranking is the normal choice for a

rational bridge player), finding a 4-3 fit which will

be more awkward to play than the nice 5-3 spade fit.

So by using the 2t response (artificial, so alertable

of course) they can reach the 5-3 spade fit since the

Landy bidder will bid 2´ after 2t asked for their

better major.

OTHER LANDY RESPONSES

2NT is normally used as natural and non-forcing.

Typically it would show about 12-14 HCPs but

would obviously deny a 4-card major to support the

Landy bidder.

3® or 3t is normally natural and invitational

(constructive but non-forcing). Typically it would

show a good 6- or even 7-card suit, and 12+ HCPs.

3™ or 3´ is also natural and invitational, promising

4-card support.

THE 2t RESPONSE REVISITED

Whilst normally this is used simply to show equal

(or no) preference for the majors it can also be used

as the prelude to stronger things.

So if you bid 2t then go to 3™ or 3´ the idea is

that this shows a stronger invitation (usually based

on more HCPs or just 3-card support) much more

useful than jumping to 3™/3´ directly which, while

still being invitational, can be bid more on shape

than HCPs.

Let's look at some examples. In each case West

bids 2® (Landy) over South's opening 1NT. What

would you respond with East's set of hands?

With Hand 1 respond 2t (equal preference),

West bids 2´ and the best part-score is reached.

With Hand 2 you can jump to 3´ (invitational

but less than through 2t). West has a close choice

whether to accept or not - here they are probably

just worth it.

With Hand 3 you can bid 2t then 3´ over 2´.

This shows a more solid invitational raise so West

has an easy acceptance here. Note you would also

have bid 3´ over a 2™ rebid by West.

With Hand 4 you can bid 2NT. West, with a full

12-count, will probably raise to 3NT.

More examples online.

Check out Neil's quiz on page 72

Dovercourt Bridge Club, Harwich, Essex

Thursday evening duplicate and Tuesday

evening Chicago, Tower Hotel, Dovercourt

www.bridgewebs.com/dovercourt

WELCOME TO OUR

™ NEWLY AFFILIATED CLUB ™

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