Page 0026

26 English Bridge February 2018 www.ebu.co.uk

Hand 1 Hand 2 Hand 3

1®-(1™)-Db-(P) 1®-(1™)-Db-(P) 1®-(1™)-Db-(P)

´ Q J 6 ´ 6 ´ K 10

™ 9 7 6 4 ™ J 7 6 ™ 7 4

t A t A Q J 4 t A J 4

® A J 5 4 2 ® A J 5 4 2 ® A K Q 7 5 4

Opener's rebid in competition - unbalanced hands

by Chris Chambers

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link

T

his is the last article to consider a bidding

situation - where opener is unbalanced or

considering a suit contract. The next and

final instalment will be a pithy summary of the

series.

We have come a long way and repercussions of

choosing five-card majors are distant. Things

should be more familiar and easier - and they will

be, mostly because we will be spared the problems

of having opened a four-card major and being

uncertain if our trump suit is sufficient - even if we

are raised. When responder supports our five-card

suit we can be almost certain our best fit has been

found.

Nevertheless there are some situations where

trump length is important and we will be more

ambitious facing four-card support rather than

three. There are also some less categorisable

occasions to look at.

Consider these situations before reading on. In

each, the hand shown rebids having opened,

opponents' actions are in parentheses.

common with weak no trump values. But for us

this hand-type is typical. Occasionally, we might

have four spades but only when the auction has

devalued our cards, say ´J763 ™Q2 tK7 ®AJ542.

Hand 2. 2®. Partner's double isn't properly takeout

and doesn't say anything about diamonds; as

above it is a cipher for a 4-card spade suit.

Accordingly, with a two-level rebid available in

the suit we opened, 2t is a reverse, a new suit in a

no-fit auction and hence shows extra values. This

treatment is not universal but typical of a

significant majority, especially among those who,

like us, use 'double of one major to promise the

other'. That means that jumps in a minor are

strong in high cards while jumps in the promised

major are based on support values (as we saw in

the previous instalment). Here, with a minimum,

rebidding clubs is the best we can do.

Hand 3. 2™A. A cue bid. We have a really good hand

and must do something that shows it; 3® would

be an underbid. Note that while cue bids usually

show support when our side has a major, that

doesn't apply to opener's rebids. After a oneminor

opener, typically these are hands worth

more than a jump-rebid in the minor, a hand that

would consider making a forcing bid in a new suit

(even an invented three-carder).

Because there might be more bidding, it is always

attractive to show good suits and shaded values in

this position; so here, 3® might be the same hand

without the diamond ace. Is this cue bid forcing

to game? I don't think so; if the message of a good

minor is explicit, partner must have a way not to

play game. But we might make the same bid with

´K10 ™864 tAQJ9 ®AKQ6

when it's not clear that good things are certain to

happen.

Hand 1. 1´. With a tatty 5-card suit and honours

in short suits, this hand was always prone to

developing badly. At least here partner has spades

- but exactly four, because 1´ would show five or

more. Opener's 1´ rebid isn't support as such;

with

´QJ64 ™976 tA ®AJ542

you would bid 2´, rebidding as if partner bid 1´

without competition. On Hand 1 the rebid is

'spare' and in a strong no trump world, rebidding

after partner's double in a three-card suit is

Index

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