Page 0027

27

February 2018 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

Hand 4 Hand 5 Hand 6

1®-(1™)-1´-(P) 1´-(2t)-3t-(P) 1™-(1´)-Db-(2´)

´ K J 7 4 ´ A K 7 6 3 ´ 10 4

™ A 6 ™ Q 10 6 2 ™ A K J 7 5

t 4 t 9 2 t A Q 7

® A Q J 10 8 7 ® A 9 ® K 5 4

Hand 4. 4t. A splinter. The knowledge that partner

has five spades increases the power of this hand.

The right cards (´AQ and ®K) make slam a

certainty and this descriptive bid will embolden

partner if she has them. Note that here 2t would

be natural and strength showing (as in Hand 2) so

3t is arguably a splinter too - but only a

shortage-raise to the three-level. Something

perhaps to ask your partner when you check the

reverses mentioned in the earlier example.

Hand 5. 3™. A game-try. Responder's cue bid raise

showed support and strength for the three-level.

This has fallen rather well: we have in-between

values and we have space to make a try. Much

depends on whether partner has four-card or,

more likely, only three (with compensating high

cards). Almost always, four card support is what

we want most, so unless responder is bare

minimum, she should accept.

But what if our hearts and clubs were reversed?

With ´AK654 ™A3 t87 ®Q1087 we would have

no convenient natural try. From such situations

the idea of 'Last Train' evolved; when there is only

one suit in which to make a game try (or slam try)

then that bid shows general values, not specific

ones - ambition rather than location. Here we bid

3™ too because there is nothing else left -3´

would be 'to play' rather than invitational. But like

many good ideas, it has its dangers - make sure

you and your partner are on the same page!

Hand 6. Double. Much the same as after oneminor,

'strong no-trump values with no stop'.

This hand is better than the minimum 15/16

working HCPs partner will expect and we will

push on to game. Here of course we have already

shown five hearts so we might easily find game in

that suit when partner has as little as

´65 ™Q3 tK542 ®A9864

and ventures a nervous 3™. Good to end on a

hand that suits the system.

SUMMARY

D After partner's double shows a major, rebid as if

the response had been one-major in a noncompetitive

auction;

D Don't undersell your good hands just because

opponents interfere;

o Bid their suit to show a good hand with lots

of tricks - often aiming for no trumps,

almost always without a stop in their suit.

o Double to show high cards with no clear

action.

D Use any available game try to give partner

another chance in close decisions.

D Make explicit support bids when you can. r

DISCIPLINARY HEARING HELD

An EBU Disciplinary Committee met to

consider the charges that, at a recent EBU

Tournament, Mr Leiv Bornecrantz (a) used

inappropriate language to a Tournament

Director, (b) used language and behaviour likely

to make people around him feel uncomfortable

and threatened, and (c) walked out of the

tournament mid-session, and that these actions

constituted a breach of the Disciplinary Rules

3.2(v) being conduct or behaviour which falls

below the acceptable standards required of

Player Members. The defendant declined to

attend the hearing.

The Committee found the defendant guilty

on all three charges. The Committee took into

account the previous disciplinary record of Mr

Bornecrantz, and for each charge imposed a

sanction of a fine of £50 and two years'

suspension of membership of the EBU, the

periods of suspension to run concurrently.

AN END TO CHEQUES

Due to costs imposed by our bank the EBU is

moving away from accepting cheque payments.

We are setting up a new online payment facility,

which will enable you to pay through the website

- look out for further details soon! With this in

mind please use one of our preferred payment

methods: debit/credit card via phone; bank

transfer or direct debit.

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072