Page 0053

53

February 2018 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk EBED NEWS AND JUNIOR BRIDGE

A HAND WITH PLENTY TO TALK ABOUT

This is a short example of the kind of material

included in our teachers' magazine, Accolade, and

shows the range of topics that can be discussed with

bridge students of differing levels of experience

with just one hand.

Dealer North ´ K 9 8 3 2

™ -

t A K 7 5

® 10 9 8 2

´ - ´ J 10 7 4

™ A K Q 2 ™ J 10 8 7 6 5

t 10 8 4 3 2 t 9

® Q J 6 3 ® 7 4

´ A Q 6 5

™ 9 4 3

t Q J 6

® A K 5

N

W E

S

North and East both pass and South opens 1´,

looking to rebid no trumps.

At this point, you can bring up or revise takeout

doubles with West, or with everyone if you show

West's cards.

Assuming the double comes from West, you can

now discuss with North what level they want to bid

to in spades. They may well say 3´, but they need to

be encouraged to allow for their shape. With players

working with Beginning Bridge this is probably best

explained with fit points, ensuring that they add

these only when they've found a fit, as in this case.

With more advanced students, they might

consider a splinter bid of 4™, or you could use this

hand to introduce the concept of using Losing Trick

Count to evaluate a hand - it shows both the

strength of North's 10 point hand and the weakness

of South's 16 point hand. Both of these topics are

covered in the last chapter of Continuing Bridge so

are probably not so appropriate for students until

they are towards the end of their second year of

learning.

If North bids 4™, what do you do as East? Of

course, the vulnerability has been deliberately left

off, so now you can discuss the implications of that

with your students, and how that effects the

decision to sacrifice or not.

The magazine is one of the many benefits of

membership of our Teachers Association, EBTA.

For more information on membership of EBTA and

how to join, go to www.ebedcio.org.uk/ebta. The

hand itself is taken from the EBED book Practice

Beginning Bridge, a companion to our student book

Beginning Bridge, both of which are available by

calling Lisa Miller on 01296 317217. There is a

discount on all of our books for members of EBTA.

KEEP BRIDGE ALIVE

AND

THE SOCIOLOGY OF BRIDGE

The University of Stirling is launching the Keep

Bridge Alive CrowdFund campaign to establish

the Sociology of Bridge. The Sociology of Bridge

is about understanding how the bridge world

works: what motivates players, opportunities for

skill development and the dynamics of the game.

The research will provide an evidence base

which will help persuade governments to

consider investing in the provision of bridge in

education and communities. We are keen for

people to join us in the campaign so we can

publicise and promote bridge more widely in

society. We would also be delighted to hear from

you if you have research ideas, expertise or even

time to support the campaign.

With the money raised, we will illustrate the

ways in which bridge combines different facets of

well-being and social connection, which

contribute to healthy ageing processes across the

lifecourse. The key goals are to shift the image of

bridge as a game for older people, to increase

participation, enhance the sustainability of the

mind sport and to communicate messages about

the benefits of bridge beyond the bridge world.

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