Page 0068

68 English Bridge February 2018 www.ebu.co.uk

Hand 1 Hand 2

´ A J 7 2 ´ A J 7 2

™ K 7 6 5 ™ K Q 10 6

t 2 t 2

® 8 7 6 5 ® K J 9 8

Hand 3 Hand 4

´ A J 7 2 ´ A J 10 2

™ A K 10 6 ™ Q 10 8 6 5

t 2 t 2

® 8 7 6 5 ® 10 6 4

BLAST FROM THE PAST - April 1947

by J H C Marx in 1947 & Richard Fleet in 2019

A

s usual, the quiz was set by Jack Marx and

was predicated on rubber bridge.

For those readers unfamiliar with this form of the

game, part-scores are carried forward until one side

makes a game. For example, if one side makes 1NT

on the first hand, they score 40 points towards game

(overtrick points are recorded separately and do not

count towards game). So they only need a further 60

points to make game while their opponents still

need 100 points.

A rubber consists of up to three games: if a pair

win the first two games, they record a bonus of 700

points; if each pair wins a game, the bonus to the

pair winning the third game is 500 points.

The existence of a part-score can make a big

difference and it was commonplace advice in the

textbooks of the time that it was important to keep

a careful eye on the score. For example, if partner

opens a weak 1NT and your side has a 60 part-score,

it would be foolish to raise to 3NT with 13 points

since making 1NT is enough for game. It is normal

to pass with a hand of this strength - 3NT is a slam

try!

L

ove All. North deals and bids 1t. What

should South bid on the following hands:

Answers from1947 and from

today's expert Richard Fleet

responding with 1™, South gives North the

opportunity of showing a four card spade length,

if he has one, at the level of 1´. A first response of

1´, on the other hand, prevents North from

showing a four card heart length except at the 2level

which, being a reverse bid, he may not be

strong enough to do. A response of 1´ may

therefore result in the best spot for the hands

never being found.

I think that most players nowadays would respond

1™ to 1t on all of these hands.

Hand 2. 1™, 4 points. 1´, 1 point. If North should

rebid 2t, South is strong enough to bid 3NT at

once, thus avoiding further information being

given to the opponents. South should therefore

adopt the same method as in Hand 1 for finding

a fitting major suit, if it exists. As he intends to bid

again in any case, a first response by South of 1´

is less disadvantageous than in Hand 1.

So far as Hand 2 is concerned, if the partnership is

playing a 2® response as forcing to game, a

treatment which for some unaccountable reason

is popular in some places, there is something to

be said for bidding 2® rather than 1™.

Hand 3. 1´, 4 points. If North should rebid 2t,

South is strong enough to show both his suits.

There is little to be gained, therefore, from

bidding them otherwise than in the normal order.

I cannot agree with Marx regarding Hand 3.

Bidding 1´ and then 2™ is asking for partner to

support spades with an inadequate holding and I

would therefore respond 1™ (and rebid 2NT over

2t).

Hand 4. 1™, 4 points. The same considerations

apply as in Hand 1.

Cont/

Hand 1.1™, 4 points. If North should make a neutral

rebid such as 2t, South's hand is not strong

enough to bid again, and he must pass. By first

Index

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