Page 0037

37

October 2019 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

Redble = clubs

1´ = natural

As ever the key is to be on the same wavelength as

your partner.

ADVANTAGES TO THIS METHOD

DSpace. You gain lots of definition by saving space.

Again you can play in a new suit at the 2-level by

transferring to it with a weak hand with 6 good

cards in the suit, totally unbiddable in normal

methods.

DThe redouble also saves space, allowing more

room for auction development.

DAll the advantages from last time can be achieved

plus you are not deprived of a natural 1NT

response. You can essentially describe virtually all

the mainstream hand types.

DISADVANTAGES

Well there's always one isn't there!

Here it is that you lose a natural redouble (people

play this as 9+ or 10+ or whatever they choose,

heaven preserve me from those who do it on 8+ or

even less systemically!). It's true - you do - but in

reality this is no great loss, much much less serious

than losing a natural 1NT, a regularly occurring

hand type. On frequency you have a standard

redouble so rarely that I really wouldn't worry.

Technically most experts play that with a hand

that would wish to make a natural redouble, you

pass then double on the next round. This shows 10+

rather than just a competing take-out double which

would otherwise have been the normal

interpretation.

Let's look at a couple of examples of how our new

ideas might work: W N E S

1™ Dble ?

East

´ Q 8 7 5

™ 4 3

t Q 8 6 5

® K 3 2

West

´ A Q J 4 2

™ 7 6 3

t K 9 8

® K 5

W N E S

1´ Dble Redble Pass

?

Here we would redouble to show our spades.

Note that after a take-out double I do not

recommend responding light - it simply does not

work, you should reserve bidding for hands with

some 7+ HCP or perhaps six points with a five-card

suit to compensate. How does opener continue?

In this example, firstly you have to remember to

alert 1´ - take care initially, it is quite easy to forget.

1´ shows clubs, usually either five with enough to

respond at the 2-level or six with a weak hand. You

have obviously gained some space now. Opener

might rebid to show a strong no trump or bid 2® to

simply state that if you have a weakish hand this is

as far as you wish to proceed. Otherwise you can

make any rebid you like (remembering partner's

most likely hand is weak with six clubs).

On hearing of clubs via the redouble I would

recommend bidding 2® here. You bidding 2® is not

natural per se - it simply states that facing a weak

hand with six clubs this is as far as you wish to go.

Partner can always bid on.

MOVING WITH THE TIMES

The bridge world has obviously allowed for

increased bidding complexity as the years have

passed. Going back 50 or 60 years top level bridge

always employed quite natural bidding methods.

These days even average club players can take

advantage of technical bidding advances, many of

which involve playing transfers in various

situations. Providing you have the mindset for it, I

strongly believe your bridge (and your results) will

significantly improve by taking on board some of

the methods I have shown over the last two

articles. As ever there is enormous room for extra

work and agreements to come out of this - I have

just dipped our collective toes in the water. Give

them a go!! r

Check out Neil's quiz online, page 68

W N E S

1™ Dble 1´A Pass

?

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