Page 0019

DAVE Ross asked: how do you play a

double of Stayman or a transfer bid in

response to 1NT?

West North East South

1NT Pass 2® Dble

or:

West North East South

1NT Pass 2t Dble

or:

West North East South

1NT Pass 2™ Dble

The simplest and most natural meaning of

these doubles is showing the cipher-suit.

So double of 2® (Stayman) shows clubs,

primarily requesting a club lead. Double

of 2t/2™ (transfer) shows diamonds and

hearts respectively. A typical double of 2®

looks like this:

´ 8 5 4 ™ 7 6 2 t A 4 ® K J 10 7 3.

More often than not, responder is

looking for a 4-4 major-suit fit on the way

to 3NT. If he finds one, you'd quite like a

club lead against four of a major. If he

doesn't, a club lead is likely to be essential,

to have any prospect of defeating 3NT.

And partner is extremely unlikely to find

one (especially from a holding like queendoubleton)

unless you can help him out

with a double.

Occasionally opener's hand will be

´ K 2 ™ K 8 5 t K 7 6 ® A Q 9 8 7:

he will redouble 2® and make it with a

400-point overtrick or two. But these

setbacks will be far outweighed from the

regular profit you will accrue from

effective lead-direction.

This is surely the best approach against

the strong no-trump, as the defending

side's prospects of game are remote when

a 15-17 point hand is out against them.

19

August 2014 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

by Tom Townsend

Your Questions Answered

Double of Stayman or Transfer Bids click

link

ONLINE EXTRAS

Rules & Maxims: Rule of Seven page 57

Bridge Club Live page 57

Five-Card Majors Part IV pages 58-63

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The lead-directing style is also good at

match-point pairs, where saving a trick

(even if it's only the overtrick) is the name

of the game.

At team-of-four, many experts play a

different method against the weak notrump,

looking to bid their own contracts

or collect penalties. This style of double

shows a hand which would have doubled

1NT, so 15-plus points or the equivalent.

One example should suffice:

N/S Game. Dealer South.

´ Q 8 7 6

™ 8 4 3 2

t 6 5 3

® 6 4

´ 9 5 ´ A K J 10

™ A 10 7 6 ™ Q J 9

t A 10 4 t Q J 8

® K 9 5 3 ® J 8 7

´ 4 3 2

™ K 5

t K 9 7 2

® A Q 10 2

West North East South

1NT1

Pass 2®2 Dble3 Pass4

Pass 2t5 Pass Pass

Dble6 Redble7 Pass 2´

Pass Pass Dble6 All Pass

1 12-14

2 Stayman - hoping to escape to anything

undoubled

3 Showing a double of 1NT

4 Something in clubs

5 Trying something else

6 Penalty

7 SOS for rescue

West leads a trump (what else?) to East's

ten. The queen of hearts comes back and

the defenders draw trumps. Eventually

they take four spade tricks, four hearts,

three diamonds and a club for down

seven: 2,000 to East-West. r

N

W E

S

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