Page 0034

35

August 2014 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

North South

Kyle Simon

1´ 2t1

2NT 3™

4™ 4NT2

5´3 6™

Pass

1 Natural, game-forcing

2 Roman Keycard Blackwood

3 Two key cards with the trump queen

Despite the known Moysian fit, Simon

Spencer and I elected to play in 6™ over an

inferior 6NT. Simon had no problem at all

in the play. On the ®4 lead, he won in

hand and cashed two rounds of diamonds

ending in hand. A diamond was ruffed, a

club played back to hand and the fourth

diamond ruffed. Simon could now draw

trumps and give up a spade in the end -

twelve tricks and +1430.

In the closed room, the Germans played

in 6NT which was one down for 17 IMPs

to the good guys. Note that 6™ may well

have play even if trumps break 5-1!

Up and down the country, the Portland

Bowl, the National Universities Knockout

reached its conclusion. Cambridge Uni versity

A and Imperial College A both saw

off their semi final opponents comfortably

and would meet for forty-eight boards in

the final, a rematch of last year's semi final

when Imperial beat Cambridge by 4 IMPs.

Despite conceding 1480 on a board (one

of the rarer scores in the game), Cam bridge

would have their revenge and won

by 25 IMPs in a match which went into the

final eight boards with nothing in it. Cam bridge

was represented by Tommy Brass,

Adam Bowden, Kyle Lam, Stefan David,

Toby Nonnenmacher and Alex Birchall.

They qual ify to play in the World Univer sity

Cham pionships held in November in

Croatia.

Jonathan Clark and Dylan Dissanayake

won the U20 Pairs, an impressive 5% clear

of second place, at the Easter Festival in

London and last but not least, there was a

large representation of Juniors at the

Schapiro Spring Fours in Stratford-uponAvon.

It is a fantastic experience, being

able to play against the world's finest

players and four juniors were even lucky

enough to draw the Sinclair team, the

eventual winners.

What next? Some Juniors head off to Fin land

(see page 5!) to play in the Midsummer

Bridge Festival and various pairs will go to

Berg hausen, Germany, to play in the Junior

European Pairs. Watch this space! r

by Kyle Lam

The Junior Page

From Amsterdam to Stratford

click

link

THE Juniors have been kept very busy

recently; here's a quick snapshot of all the

havoc they've been wreaking.

In late March, the team of Simon

Spencer, Kyle Lam, Toby Nonnenmacher

and Alex Roberts with NPC Mike Bell

travelled to Amsterdam to play in the

White House Junior Internationals, an

event with some of the strongest U25

teams from all over the world including

from Poland, China, Japan, Sweden to

name but only a few. The event kicked off

with a warm-up "Patton" scored event (a

mixture between IMPs and Point-a-Board

scoring). It was probably a combination of

the fact that most of the teams didn't

know what was going on and our

excellence in the format (more the former

I'd assume) that we ended up as the

eventual top Junior team. The main event

began the following day and we hoped to

continue our success. Seventeen ten-board

matches over the next three days would

decide the top four that would qualify for

the semi finals. Despite strong perf or mances

against the more experienced

sides, beating three of the top four teams

and the eventual winners, Norway, we

struggled against the weaker sides and this

eventually cost us as we finished 11th,

despite beating all but three of the sides

above us. The following board against

Germany A was selected as one of the best

bid boards of the competition:

N/S Game. Dealer North.

´ A 7 6 5 4

™ K Q 5

t K 8

® 5 3 2

´ K J 10 9 8 ´ 2

™ 7 3 ™ 8 6 4 2

t 7 4 t Q J 10 6

® J 7 6 4 ® Q 10 9 8

´ Q 3

™ A J 10 9

t A 9 5 3 2

® A K

N

W E

S

Junior players socialising at Stratford-upon-Avon

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