Page 0037

preserve the option of a third-round

trump entry to dummy. When declarer

cashed the ace of diamonds at trick two

and both defenders followed suit, the

contract was unbeatable whatever the dis tribution

of the missing cards. He crossed

to dummy's king of diamonds, still pre serv ing

his diamond three, ruffed a club high

and cashed the ´A-K, ending in dummy.

Now came the coup de grâce: dummy's jack

of clubs was led and declarer dis carded a

spade! Whoever won the club trick and

whatever he did next, the defenders were

powerless.

It is worth looking at some of the

possibilities:

(i) East takes the ace of clubs and

switches to a spade. South discards a

heart, aiming to discard his other

heart on dummy's jack of spades -a

loser-on-loser play. Note the impor tance

of South's carefully preserved

three of diamonds: overtaking it with

dummy's four is the vital entry to

dummy to get to the jack of spades.

(ii) East takes the ace of clubs and

switches to a heart. South plays low

and West wins. West switches to a

spade (if he has one). Declarer plays

dummy's jack of spades. Either this

wins the trick, allowing a heart dis card

or East covers with the queen of

spades which declarer ruffs; he next

enters dummy by overtaking the care -

fully preserved diamond three with

the four, and discards the ten of

hearts on the thirteenth spade.

HHHHH

I end this article with yet another dreadful

slam! South was lucky and his card play

was exceptional but it needed to be after

his wild overbidding. When North could

only raise 1´ to 2´, what on earth made

South believe that a balanced 16-points

made slam a possibility? This was another

38 English Bridge August 2014 www.ebu.co.uk

by Andrew Kambites

The Magic of Bridge

Perfect Timing

click

link

THE deal in Layout A was played by the

flamboyant Adam 'Plum' Meredith who

sat South:

Layout A

Love All. Dealer North.

´ 2

™ K J

t A 6

® A J 8 7 5 4 3 2

´ 8 7 6 5 4 3 ´ Void

™ Q 10 6 ™ 8 7 5 4

t Void t K J 10 9 8 7 5 4 2

® K Q 10 9 ® Void

´ A K Q J 10 9

™ A 9 3 2

t Q 3

® 6

West North East South

1® 5t 5´

Pass 6® Pass 6´

Dbl All Pass

The play exploded into life when West led

the king of clubs, dummy played the ace of

clubs and East discarded the two of dia monds.

East's failure to ruff marked him

with thirteen red cards. Presumably West

would have led a diamond (his partner's

suit) if he had one, so East had precisely a

0-4-9-0 shape. Meredith realised he

needed four heart tricks: West's tripleton

would have to include the ten and queen

of hearts. However, with West having as

many trumps as South, how could he get

back to hand to make the nine of hearts?

No problem! He would use the queen of

diamonds to return to hand and enlist the

help of an unwilling East. He drew six

rounds of trumps, discarding four clubs

and the diamond ace! Now he finessed

dummy's jack of hearts, and cashed the

heart king. With just the ™Q-10 left West

did his best by dropping the queen of

hearts, the card he was known to hold.

Meredith continued with the six of

diamonds. East took his king of diamonds

and hopefully tried a heart. Of course,

Meredith was not fooled. West was known

to have exactly one heart left, so why

would he have dropped the queen of

hearts unless he also held the ten? Equally,

if East still had the ™10-x why didn't he

exit with a diamond, giving declarer no

chance? Meredith rose with the ace of

hearts, dropping the ten and cashed the

nine of hearts and the queen of diamonds

to make his contract.

Now if Philip Grosvenor and his brother

had been sitting East and West the story

might have had a different ending!

HHHHH

In Layout B, North-South bid to 5t with

no opposition bidding. West led the king of

clubs. There are ten obvious tricks and

many chances for an eleventh, but the cards

were not lying well and declarer needed a

very precise sequence of plays to succeed:

Layout B

Game All. Dealer South.

´ K J 5 3

™ J 6 3

t K 4 2

® J 10 9

´ 6 4 ´ Q 10 9 8

™ Q 8 7 4 ™ K 9 2

t 8 5 t J

® K Q 5 4 2 ® A 8 7 6 3

´ A 7 2

™ A 10 5

t A Q 10 9 7 6 3

® Void

At trick one declarer made the far-sighted

play of ruffing the king of clubs with the

six of diamonds, preserving his three of

diamonds. This sort of play would not

occur to most players but it costs nothing

and even if you cannot see exactly how the

play will develop it cannot do any harm to

N

W E

S

N

W E

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