Page 0009

CORWEN TROPHY

PAUL Barden and Jon Cooke have

won the Corwen Trophy, held in

Northampton on 31st May and 1st

June.

The Corwen Trophy is open to the

leading pairs in the current pairs

championship of each County

Association of the EBU. Paul and Jon

qualified as representatives of Cambs

& Hunts CBA, and finished with

59.69%, narrowly beating 2011 winners

Peter Lee - Bob Rowlands of

Surrey on 59.51%.

Completing the podium were Paul

Madden - John Squibb of Derbyshire

on 58.75%.

9

August 2014 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

The Kokish Convention

by Heather Dhondy

Heather's Hints

click

link

COMMONWEALTH

NATIONS BRIDGE

CHAMPIONSHIP

The 4th Commonwealth Nations

Bridge Championship will take place in

Glasgow from 8 - 14 September 2014.

Each member nation of the 71

Commonwealth states

is invited to enter, and England will be

represented by two teams:

Ben Green - John Holland

Phil King - Cameron Small, and

Catherine Curtis - Paul Fegarty

David Kendrick - Jonathan Mestel.

Vu-graph facilities will be

available free of charge.

A Transnational Swiss Teams event

and Open Pairs event will also

take place, and entries for these

are open to all.

Full info at www.

commonwealthbridgescotland.com

Game All. Dealer North.

´ K 10 4 2

™ K Q J 7 2

t A

® A K Q

´ J 7 6 3

™ 3

t Q 10 9 6 4 2

® J 3

West North East South

2® Pass 2t

Pass 2™ Pass 2´

Pass 3´ Pass 4´

All Pass

PLAYING teams, what should North open?

North is simply too strong to consider

anything other than 2®. Over 2®,

South responds with a negative

2t. Playing the 'Kokish Relay'

(see www.bridgeguys.com/conve

ntions/kokish_relays.html), a 2™ re bid

by opener shows either hearts or a

game-forcing balanced hand. Partner is

more-or-less obliged to relay with 2´, after

which opener describes which of these

hand-types he holds. All bids other than

2NT or 3NT show hearts, and here North

can rebid 3´ to show at least five hearts and

four spades. The advantage to this method

is that you do not need to jump to 3NT over

partner's 2t response with 25+ points. This

allows room to use Stayman and transfers,

and find the best contract. On this deal,

South simply raises to 4´ and that becomes

the final contract. West begins with the ace

of hearts, East playing low, and continues

with the ten of hearts, an obvious

doubleton. How do you play?

You will need to restrict your trump

losers to two. The lead is an unusual one,

being dummy's known long suit, and is

N

W E

S

unlikely to have been made from good

trumps, since otherwise West would not be

seeking a ruff. If you ruff this heart and play

a trump towards dummy, you are likely to

suffer a trump promotion if it loses to the

queen. You will be on a guess to make it

even if it loses to the ace. You should guard

against the likely holding of the ace and

queen of trumps in East's hand by winning

the heart in dummy and playing a low

trump towards the jack. The full deal was:

´ K 10 4 2

™ K Q J 7 2

t A

® A K Q

´ 8 5 ´ A Q 9

™ A 10 ™ 9 8 6 5 4

t K 7 5 t J 8 3

® 9 8 6 5 4 2 ® 10 7

´ J 7 6 3

™ 3

t Q 10 9 6 4 2

® J 3

Heather's Hints

• If the opponents lead a short suit,

especially when you or dummy are

known to have length, they must

have a suitable trump holding to be

seeking a ruff (i.e. two or three

small cards). The lead is dangerous

since it could play straight into

declarer's hands, so why would

they risk it with what might turn

out to be natural trump winners?

• Be wary of a trump promotion

when the opponents have led a short

suit and you are missing some

significant intermediate cards. On

this deal the fact that you were mis sing

the eight and nine of trumps

was enough to cause a problem. r

N

W E

S

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link

Index

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