Page 0035

35

December 2018 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

Love All. Dealer South

´ Q 10 5 3

™ K Q 6 4

t 9 5

® 10 3 2

´ 8 ´ 9 7 2

™ J 9 8 7 ™ 10 3

t K Q 7 2 t 10 8 6 4 3

® A K Q 6 ® 9 7 4

´ A K J 6 4

™ A 5 2

t A J

® J 8 5

N

W E

S

´ -

™ K Q 6 4

t 9

® -

´ - ´ -

™ J 9 8 7 ™ 10 3

t Q t 10 8 6

® - ® -

´ J (led)

™ A 5 2

t J

® - N

W E

S

West North East South

Dble 2´1 Pass 2NT

Pass 4´2 All Pass

1 Close to 3´, especially after the double

(good preemptive tactic to bid half a level

higher after a double). 2 North catches up. It

looks right to play in spades rather than no

trumps, with his two weak suits; however,

because the opponents cannot run five club

tricks, 3NT is a cinch, with nine top tricks.

A

squeeze is a play which forces an opponent,

with an embarrassment of riches, to discard

at a time when he would prefer not to. The

term was coined by US great Sidney Lenz back in

the 1920s.

It is a generally held belief that squeeze-play is the

domain of the expert. But this need not be so, as

many squeezes simply play themselves. Witness this

deal, in which all declarer needs to do is keep his

head and watch out for one card.

A December Squeeze . . .

An introduction to squeezes click

link

by Andrew Robson

The lead is the ®A. West naturally cashes three

top clubs, then switches to the king of diamonds.

Ostensibly, it looks as though you, as declarer, need

a 3-3 heart split for your tenth trick. Actually you

are far better placed to try a squeeze, especially

given that West has advertised the tQ and is likely

to have four hearts for his double of 1´.

Play out all your trumps - yes - don't stop playing

trumps because your opponents have run out. As

you play the last trump, West will find it impossible

to discard. Here is the ending as you lead the ´J:

If West lets go of a heart, dummy's hearts will

provide four tricks. West can see that, so in practice

will discard the queen of diamonds, hoping his

partner can guard the suit with the jack.

No good. The tQ was the one card you were

looking out for. If you did not see it, you would play

out dummy's hearts in the hope of a fourth-round

length winner. But with West's tQ going, you can

table the jack, a promoted winner. 10 tricks and

game made.

You pulled off a Simple Automatic Squeeze:

Simple, because just one opponent was squeezed;

Automatic, because the squeeze would have worked

on either opponent, provided they alone guarded

both red suits. r

The deal is taken from Andrew Robson's Endplay

& Squeeze, one of his series of invaluable Bridge

Lessons books. They are available from the EBU's

www.bridge-warehouse.co.uk

Index

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