Page 0041

DEC_08_EB_p41 Beijing Simpson 13/11/08 5:35 pm Page 37

Seniors teams:

REPORTS

A bridge

Beijing, China

3 – 18 October 2008

too far

A SUDDEN illness on the morning of West North East South

departure meant that one of our team was Silverstone Eisenberg Dixon Lev

Colin Simpson

unable to travel to Beijing. Luckily the 2♣

solution to the crisis was easily found: 3♠ Pass1 5♠ 6♣

Peter Czerniewski changed his job descrip- Pass 6♦! Pass 7♣ In both rooms South opened a strong 1NT

tion from non-playing captain, and formed All Pass which became the final contract. Peter

a new partnership with Ross Harper while 1

Values Czerniewski received a heart lead to East’s

remaining in charge. The rest of the team ace, followed by the queen which he took.

was the same as in the European Cham- Declarer for the USA was Sam Lev, worthy The ace and queen of diamonds held, so

pionships last June: Chris Dixon and partner of former member of the Dallas he cashed the heart jack and led a club

Victor Silverstone, with David Price and Aces, Billy Eisenberg. As might be expected, towards the queen, ducked by West. He

myself. he adopted the same line as Price to bring could now win the club ace, exit with

The participants were divided into two home the grand slam which had about a another club and wait for his spade king

groups of sixteen, each playing a round- 2% chance of success. The huge swing on to score and ensure his contract.

robin with the top eight in each group this board meant that we lost the match

progressing to a knock-out stage, begin- 18-12 VPs instead of winning it 18-12.

ning with a round of sixteen. Despite this setback, we were always in a

Perhaps we should have noticed how qualifying position throughout the round-

our luck was going to pan out from this robin. Our hopes of a high finish and

deal from our first-day match against the choice of opponents in the round of sixteen,

pre-tournament favourites, the USA: however, were crushed by two small losses

on the last day. A strong Polish squad

chose to play against us and for half of the

Photo: Ron Tacchi

N/S Game. Dealer South. 56-board match their decision seemed

♠84 justified as they held a tiny lead. The second

♥AQ87 half was all in our favour and we came out

♦J975432 on top by 50 IMPs.

♣ Void In the quarter-final, our opponents were Peter Czerniewski

♠ QJ7653 ♠ K 10 9 2 Japan, who had beaten us in the round At the other table the defence started in a

♥ K642 W

N

E

♥ 10 9 5 robin, but we were keen to reverse that similar fashion but when the Japanese

♦ K S ♦ Q 10 6 result. The next deal, albeit a low-level declarer led towards the club queen, Chris

♣ 87 ♣ 10 4 3 contract, shows good declarer play and Dixon rose with the king, cashed the king of

♠A fine defence by our team: diamonds and the ten of hearts, and exited

♥J3 with a club. If declarer had kept his club

♦A8 holding intact, he could have prevailed by

♣AKQJ9652 Love All. Dealer East. overtaking his queen with the ace and

♠ 10 6 5 exiting with a club, but as he had discar-

♥9752 ded one on the king of diamonds he had

With no opposition bidding, David Price ♦ J 10 8 5 to settle for one down.

and Colin Simpson bid to 6♣. After a ♣Q6 Unfortunately for us, Japan played very

spade lead, Price drew trumps and then ♠ AQJ ♠873 well throughout and for the English Seniors

N

led the jack of hearts, covered by the king ♥ 10 6 4 3 W E

♥AQ it was a bridge too far. Our only crumb of

and ace. He returned to his hand with the ♦ K72 S ♦9643 comfort was that Japan went on to win the

ace of diamonds and then played out all ♣ K J 10 ♣8732 Gold medal and our quarter-final defeat

his trumps, thereby squeezing East who ♠K942 gave us a better opportunity to cheer on

held the guards in both diamonds and ♥KJ8 England’s other highly successful teams.

hearts. Nicely played for the overtrick. ♦AQ

In the other room the bidding took a ♣A954 Top three:

bizarre turn: 1. Japan; 2. USA; 3. Indonesia.

www.ebu.co.uk December 2008 English Bridge 37

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064