Page 0023

1 Natural, but may not be four cards (third suit forcing).

2 Minimum hand, usually a doubleton spade (nonforcing).

3 Forcing with a club fit.

4 Best possible spade holding.

´ K 4 ´ A Q J 3 2

™ A Q 9 2 ™ K J 10 3

t 4 t A 5 2

® A J 7 6 4 2 ® 3

West East

1® 1´

2® 2™

3™1 4t2

4´3 4NT4

5´5 7™6

1 Forcing, as partner may not have four hearts.

2 East has to cue-bid 4t to agree hearts. 3´ or 4® would

be natural, and suggest that he does not have four

hearts.

3 West has a huge hand opposite a slam try in hearts

but doesn't know enough about the hand to take

control.

4 Roman Key-card Blackwood. The spade cue-bid

(which must be the king) is extremely good news.

5 Two out of five 'aces' and the queen of trumps.

6 Five spade tricks, two-minor suit aces, four trumps and

two club ruffs in hand comes to thirteen (the singleton

diamond is not needed).

Spare Bids

If 1® -1´ -2® -2™ is forcing, that leaves you free

to find a meaning for 1® -1´ -2® -3™. Don't try

this without discussion, as there are two sensible

meanings: either a singleton heart and a slam try in

clubs, or game forcing with at least 5-5 in the

majors. Both of these hands are not easy to show,

and they are both useful meanings; you just need to

agree which you will play.

A Step Further

The approach described here is to bid your better

red suit 'naturally' in the auction 1® -1´ -2® -?

Holding:

´ K Q 10 7 2 ™ A K 3 t 7 2 ® A 8 4

you bid 2™; with:

´ K Q 10 7 2 ™ 7 2 t A K 3 ® A 8 4

23

August 2015 English Bridge

www.ebu.co.uk

you bid 2t. This is the most descriptive way of

bidding the hand.

It is possible to take this approach a step further

and play the cheapest 'third suit forcing' as

completely artificial. Bidding 2t as responder after

1® -1´ -2® doesn't show diamonds at all, it is just

a forcing bid asking opener to describe his hand

further. 2™ retains its original meaning of natural

and non-forcing. This adds a lot of definition to

these auctions, but there is no point unless you and

your partner are prepared to discuss the method in

detail (for example: 1® -1´ -2® -2t -2™ -3t:

is this showing 5-5 in spades and diamonds, or is it

'fourth suit forcing' looking for a diamond stop?).

Other Third Suit Auctions

There are a number of similar auctions: after 1t -

1™ -2t, 2´ and 3® are both 'third suit' and

because of the higher level they are both usually

played as game forcing. Opener has denied four

spades, so responder is free to bid 2´ on, say, K-Q-x

without worrying about it being raised.

In fact, you will come to realise there are twentyfour

possible 'third suit' auctions and you can spend

many hours discussing each of them individually.

Good luck! r

W E

A monthly publication

featuring book reviews,

news, quizzes &

competitions, readers'

letters, special

subscriber offers

and much more.

Bridge Magazine's

outstanding team of writers cover every

aspect of the game and deliver a 'mustread'

publication no bridge player can

afford to be without.

SPECIAL OFFER FOR EBU MEMBERS:

Register for a FREE

3 month subscription at

bridgemagazine.co.uk

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074