Page 0060

Slaughter/killing

RSPCA welfare standards

for domestic/common ducks

53 February 2015

* indicates an amendment

S 6.4

Where electrical water stunning baths are used:

a) the stunning bath must be set at a height appropriate for the size and number of birds

b) the height must be set to ensure the heads of the birds are fully immersed in the water

c) there must be a voltage sufficient to produce a minimum current of 130mA (0.130A) per bird

d) a sinusoidal (AC) waveform must be used (stunning using a DC waveform is prohibited)

e) they must operate at a frequency of 50Hz

f) each bird must be in contact with the electrical current for a minimum of 4 seconds

g) the water bath must be of sufficient size and depth and the water must not overflow at the entrance

h) the electrode, which is immersed in the water, must extend the length of the water bath

i) birds must not receive pre-stun shocks

j) the water bath must be fitted with an ammeter to accurately monitor current flow through the bath

when loaded with birds.

50Hz sine wave (AC) is the optimum frequency and waveform for inducing cardiac arrest. The

heart muscle is particularly sensitive to this frequency and when sufficient current is applied to

the heart it ceases to beat normally and pump blood around the body. Therefore, an effective

stun-to-kill can be achieved when using this frequency, which is the most preferred outcome to

achieve good welfare during killing.

A steeply inclined flat ramp bolted on to the entrance of the waterbath can be effective in

avoiding pre-stun shocks. The ramp should extend over the water so the birds get drawn up

the ramp by the shackle line and then swing down into the water in one smooth movement.

This results in the bird's head entering the water first and the bird is stunned immediately.

Care must be taken to ensure birds do not receive pre-stun shocks from the ramp itself. This

may occur if the ramp is electrically live because of water flowing from the bath onto the ramp

or if it is not isolated from the rest of the stunner.

Source: Humane Slaughter Association (HSA). 2006. HSA Technical Note 16: Prevention of

Pre-Stun Shocks in Electrical Waterbaths. HSA, Wheathampstead, Herts., UK (www.hsa.org.uk).

S 6.5 The shackle - at the point where it meets the duck's foot - must be wet prior to the bird entering the

stun bath.

Ideally, the wetting of the shackle should be before the bird is hung.

S 6.6 Where electrical hand-held stunners are used:

a) ducks must be restrained in a cone or on a shackle

b) birds must be stunned without delay after being restrained

c) care must be taken to ensure that the stunning electrodes are applied in the optimum position,

i.e. applied firmly to either side of the head between the eye and ear

d) hand-held stunners must deliver 400mA for at least 10 seconds and until initial wing flapping ceases

(or if held in a cone, until legs become rigid and extended)

e) neck cutting must be carried out immediately (see S 7.1).

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074
  75. Page 0075
  76. Page 0076