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114

I was born in Strasbourg, a tiny c y, then I

moved to London and onwards to Paris. When fi rst in the city, we lived in

Montparnasse, a bohemian area on the Left Bank where artists lived

during the 1930s, and we now live in Batignolles. Batignolles is a great

village in the 17th arrondissement. It is relatively free of tourists, has

excellent independent shops, markets, and parks. It's also moving up

fast, the new Tribunal de Paris (law courts) have moved there, bringing

9,000 legal workers and judges into the area. House hunters love the

many villages of Paris. Popular quartiers are Mairie du 18ème, Gaîté

Montparnasse, des Enfants Rouges and Monge. Using a bike to get

around Paris has been especially useful during transport strikes as the

city is small. I can cycle from one side of Paris to the other in 30 minutes.

I cycle 15-20 miles per day, and it is better for the environment than

driving a car. The property market in Paris is bustling right now It is is

not unusual in one day to have six or seven viewings on an apartment

in the 350,000 € to 700,000 € bracket and have an off er for the asking

price within 24 hours. Prices increased by 8% last year and projected

to rise by 7% in 2020. My days are never the same. I might start at

10am to meet vendors and also buyers, but then grab a coff ee or lunch at

a brasserie with clients to talk about their plans. This is what Parisians do! But we work very hard, and usually

work weekends too. Buyers tend to choose an area based on their commute and budget. Close proximity

to a Metro station is essential, and schools might also be an important factor, many can be reached within half

an hour as Paris is a third the size of London. The typical budget is 500,000 € to 900,000 € for an apartment,

and they are more available than houses - there are only 3,000 houses in Paris! Whether they spend 250,000 €

or €10m, I like to see a smile on a buyer's face. It's always a happy time

accompanying clients to the Notaire's offi ce to complete the sale. For

many, it's the start of a new adventure and a dream come true.

Buyers are mainly from the UK and America but also come from a wide

variety of places, including South Africa, Australia, and the Philippines

lately. Half of our buyers are French. Forget the suburbs, Paris is

about living in the centre. It's there that you can enjoy the wonderful

markets, the cafés and the opera, and within 90 minutes you can be in

Lyon or Bordeaux within 2 hours by TGV. I spend a lot of time on an

island. On the River Seine, the Île de la Cité is home to Notre Dame

(currently being restored after the fi re last year) and on Île Saint-Louis

you'll fi nd the Leggett offi ce. It's exciting to be in Paris. We have the

Rugby World Cup in 2023 and the Summer Olympics in 2024. French

has also just been voted the 'Best Nationality in the World' based on the

quality of life, freedom, and opportunities.

Come and see for yourself !

Dominique

I was born in Strasbourg, a tiny c y, then I

moved to London and onwards to Paris. When fi rst in the city, we lived in

Montparnasse

during the 1930s, and we now live in Batignolles.

village in the 17th arrondissement

excellent independent shops, markets, and parks. It's also moving up

fast, the new

10am to meet vendors and also buyers, but then grab a coff ee or lunch at

a brasserie with clients to talk about their plans. This is what Parisians do! But we work very hard, and usually

Proud to be an agent

* If you would like to work for Leggett,

please email us : recruitment@leggett.fr

LEGGETTFRANCE.COM

Having spent 28 years living in London and working in property,

Dominique Petit moved to Paris nine years ago with his British

wife. The 58-year-old heads up the Legge“ offi ce in Paris.

By Liz Rowlinson.

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