Page 0020

Half-timbered homes with

wooden framework infilled with

brick, torchis (cob) or plaster.

Wood is used on both the interior and exterior,

giving these

properties charm and style!

This type of construction dates

back to Norman times. Sometimes the lower

storey may be

constructed of stone with half

timbering used for the upper.

In old towns colombage houses

might include a corbelling

Bastide is the local term for a

manor house in Provençe. Larger and more

elegant than the

farmhouses called mas, these

properties were originally occupied by

wealthy farmers. Usually square

or rectangular with

tile roofs, the walls are created

of local stone sometimes covered

with stucco or whitewash.

By the 19th and 20th centuries,

many were being used as summer houses by

wealthy citizens

of Marseille - more recently

BASTIDE they've been transformed into

highly enviable country homes.

The simpler mas were built

near springs, while bastides

will sit on a rise from which the

countryside can be surveyed.

Windows are placed symmetrically around

a central entrance

which opens under a wroughtiron

balcony or marquise glass

canopy. To the front will stretch

a long terrace matching the

proportions of the façade.

structure - a piece of wood

jutting out of a wall - to provide

more space on the upper floor

rooms (a technique used since

Neolithic times). There are

many fine examples of colombage

homes in Normandy and

Burgundy as well as in the old

bastide towns of south western

France where the infill is more

likely to be of russet brick.

COLOMBAGE

VAUCLUSE €675,000

Not far from Orange, a beautiful 5 bed bastide with

swimming pool. Well built and protected from the mistral

winds. Views over vineyards, Mont Ventoux and the

Dentelles de Montmirail. Ref: 69056JBO84H

CALVADOS €246,000

A charming example of a colombage dwelling. Awash

with beautiful beams and set within charming gardens.

Ref: 60506PD014

WORDS: HELEN HOLBROOK

LEGGETTFRANCE.COM

20 Here's our guide to the varied styles of houses you

are sure to see when visiting parts of France.French Style

Index

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