Page 0033

If you own a holiday home and

will never intend spending more

than 90 days there in every six

months then essentially little has

changed for you. You will just need

to ensure you do not go over your

allowance - there are a number

of online calculators available

to help you keep tabs on this.

Also, there has been discussion

on forums about the need for

homeowners to provide any house

guests from non-EU countries with

an attestation d'accueil, an official

document from the Mairie. It is now

believed that this is not needed

for UK citizens, merely proof of the

address - be it your second home

or your host's, or a hotel, that you

are visiting.

However, if you have what

is genuinely used as a second

home - where you spend half

of each year, or perhaps four

months every summer - then you

will need to apply for a long-stay

visa before you leave for France,

through the third-party company

called TLS Contact that processes

visa applications on behalf of

the French consulates in the UK.

Second-home owners are currently

campaigning to have the right to

able to spend 180 continuous days

in France (instead of 90+90), as

European Union owners of second

homes in the UK can do.

Until anything changes, there

are two relevant long-stay visas for

visitors: the  VLS-T  and the  VLSTS.

They are just two of the types

of Long Stay Visitors Visa (Visa

Long Sejour or VLS), depending on

your purpose of entry. The cost

starts at €99 per adult for these

visas and the process should take

about three weeks. You will need

to show that your passport is valid

at least three months beyond the

visa expiry date and prove you

can financially support yourself

during your visit, have somewhere

to stay and have adequate health

insurance.

If you do not yet own your

home but will be staying with

a host or in a hotel, the French

consulate website gives financial

guidelines: a minimum is required

of between €65-120 per day of

stay, depending on whether you

can present a hotel booking.

If you are hosted by an

individual, you must provide a

certificate of staying with a relative

validated in the Mairie at the

request of the person who invited

you.

The  VLS-T Visiteur (visa de long

séjour - temporaire)  is for those

who wish to stay for between

three and six months, such as

second homeowners who want

an extended stay at their French

holiday home, but not to work. It

is not renewable in France so you

must leave when it runs out. But,

if you stay in France for less than

six months on this visa, after 90

days back in the UK, you should be

able to return to France or another

Schengen country for the rest of

your annual 180-day quota.

33

LEGGETT IMMOBILIER - LOCAL KNOWLEDGE YOU CAN TRUST

Holiday home owners &

second-home owners

Don't forget that Leggett

has now started a

property management

company and can look

after your keys for free

if there is a property

manager locally. Our

local property managers

can organise security

checks, gardening, pool

maintenance and many

other tasks. Full details at

www.leggettpm.com

STRUGGLING

TO VISIT YOUR

SECOND HOME?

If you are resident in France:

All residents need healthcare and

you must register in the system to

receive your Carte Vitale. If you

are working, either as an employee

or self employed, you will be

entitled to healthcare and pay for

it through your cotisations. If you

are a pensioner you apply for your

Carte Vitale as an S1 holder. If you

are an early retiree or economically

inactive you apply through the

Protection Universelle Maladie

(PUMa) scheme.

If you are visiting your second home,

or are a tourist:

You will need to have health

insurance or face hefty bills if you

fall ill. The UK Government has said

that you can use your current EHIC

card until it expires. If you don't

hold an EHIC card you can apply for

the new Global Health Insurance

Card (GHIC). This card will allow

you to access state provided

healthcare in France whilst visiting.

The EHIC and its replacement GHIC

remain free of charge.

HEALTHCARE

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