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‰ Organizing a regional best practice community for the

control of cancer.

‰ Exchanging information and knowledge related to the

topic.

‰ Identifying the needs, opportunities and common

interests related to the control of cancer and searching

for alternatives that can be shared.

‰ Promoting coordination among member countries to

strengthen management and institutional development

of the region's national cancer institutes and institutions.

‰ Promoting the commitment of every countries'

corresponding levels of government with emphasis on

the availability of financial, human and legislative

resources necessary for the development of cancer

control.

The structure of RINC consists further of working groups.

These are teams of experts structured according to strategic

issues and responsible for developing and coordinating the

implementation of action plans in each of the thematic areas

identified as priorities by the Management Council (8).

Cervical cancer and breast cancer control, cancer

registries and biobanking were agreed by consensus as the

priorities for countries to address together the cancer

problem in their region. The Five Year Plan 2010-2015 of

the UNASUR Health Council was also taken into

consideration (9).

The National Cancer Institute of Brazil was assigned to

coordinate the Network and provide technical and

administrative support for the operation of RINC through an

Executive Secretariat.

Cervical cancer: A regional public health problem

The most common malignancies in Latin America are lung

(still increasing among women), prostate, breast, colorectal

and gastric cancer. Cervical cancer remains the second most

common type among women of all ages in terms of incidence

and a leading cause of mortality in the lowest income parts of

the region. Social determinants, such as poverty, low levels of

education and ethnicity lead to a disproportionate burden of

cancer on the most vulnerable populations, especially

women. With about 68,800 new cases and 28,500 deaths

(10), cervical cancer became a top priority to be addressed

by most governments in South and Central America and in

the Caribbean.

RINC's goal is to strongly contribute to reduce the

incidence and mortality from the disease by providing a

platform for technical exchange and assistance among

countries in the region to strengthen prevention

programmes. In August 2012 the Network established a

Working Group for Cervical Cancer Control composed of

experts from 13 countries. Based on an assessment of the

situation in the region, the Group has put in place five basic

projects with the following objectives:

‰ To provide evidence and technical support to reduce

access barriers to diagnosis, monitoring and treatment.

‰ To provide technical assistance and exchange knowledge

and regional experiences for the incorporation of Visual

Inspection with Acetic Acid (VIAA) and the "See and

Treat" strategy in the context of organized programmes

(HPV Test and vaccine).

‰ To provide technical support and transfer knowledge and

regional experiences to incorporate new prevention

technologies based on the HPV virus in the context of

organized programmes (HPV Test and vaccine).

‰ To strengthen registration systems, monitoring and

evaluation of cervical cancer prevention programmes (11).

RINC and IARC: A strategic partnership to deliver

changes in cancer registration

In the context of an increasing cancer burden, the

implementation of cancer control plans based on quality

information to deliver and evaluate actions is of the utmost

relevance. RINC members recognize the central role of

cancer registries in providing the evidence base for effective

strategies for cancer prevention and control, and for

government planning in the context of the political agenda

that resulted from the UN General Assembly commitment

towards a 25% reduction in the mortality from NCDs by

2025.

RINC's unprecedented initiative of setting up a Working

Group for Cancer Registries with 14 Latin American

countries was welcomed by the World Health

Organization´s International Agency for Research on Cancer

(IARC) (8). Through this initiative, a close collaboration with

IARC was started, maximizing the effectiveness of RINC's

strategy for the region. The model that has been agreed to

deliver the changes in cancer registration is structured

around the creation of a regional hub in Latin America (the

GICR-LA Hub). In 2014, the Latin American Hub was

established with a coordinating centre at the National

Cancer Institute of Argentina in Buenos Aires and a series of

contributing centres within countries in the region willing to

contribute to specific areas of expertise. Key activities of the

Hub are to provide localized training, tailored support, to

foster research and assist with advocacy and develop

networks. However, due to disparities in coverage and

quality of the existing population-based cancer registries

REGIONAL INITIATIVES

126 CANCER CONTROL 2015

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