Page 0047

successful global health initiatives such as the fight against

HIV/AIDS (7). While not suggesting there should a

mechanical application of the lessons learnt, there are

however useful concepts that could be adapted for effective

and sustainable responses to the increasing cancer epidemic

in LMICs. This section will focus on two such concepts,

namely, advocacy and innovative financing.

Advocacy

The UN General Assembly's 2001 Special Session on

HIV/AIDS has been described as a catalytic moment for the

global fight against HIV/AIDS. This historic event, which was

the first time that the UN had convened a major meeting of

world leaders to address a specific health issue, propelled

HIV/AIDS to the forefront of global health. Entitled "Global

Crisis - Global Action", participants at the Special Session

endorsed a Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, which

rallied the international community around the disease,

prompting stronger national, regional and international

political commitments at the highest level.

The 2001 UN General Assembly's Special Session also led

to the creation of transformational initiatives such as the

Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the

United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief

(PEPFAR).

While one could argue that the UN organized a similar

high-level meeting on NCDs in 2011, more needs to be done.

It is only with strong political commitments at the highest

level - both internationally and nationally - that the cancer

crisis in LMICs will be able to move to the centre stage of the

international global health debate. That is why advocacy

initiatives such as the Forum of African First Ladies against

Breast and Cervical Cancer, should be encouraged. Through

its annual "Stop Cervical Cancer in Africa Conference" and

"Global Summit on Women Cancers in Africa", the Forum has

brought international attention to the cancer burden in

Africa. This type of advocacy can be very effective since it

can make the world rally round the emerging global cancer

crisis just as it did with HIV/AIDS.

Innovative financing

The World Bank describes innovative funding as a process

that "involves non-traditional applications of solidarity,

public-private partnerships (PPPs) and catalytic mechanisms

that (a) support fundraising by tapping new sources and

engaging investors beyond the financial dimensions of

transactions, as partners and stakeholders in development;

or (b) deliver financial solutions to development problems on

the ground" (8).

While it could be argued that innovative financing

predates the discovery of HIV/AIDS, it is impossible to deny

the fact that the international advocacy around the

pandemic buttressed the need for innovative financing for

health, as it would have been impossible to meet the

exponential cost of treatment and prevention in LMICs. For

instance, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and

Malaria leveraged the upsurge in the interest generated by

private funders to create a new type of PPP that would fund

the fight against the three diseases in LMICs (9).

Established in 2006 as the "International Drug Purchasing

Facility", UNITAID uses innovative financing - "solidarity

contributions" - to increase funding for greater access to

treatments and diagnostics for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis,

malaria and more recently hepatitis C in LMICs.

Approximately half of UNITAID's finances come from a levy

on air tickets.

With its international financial backing, UNITAID

supports programmes that are expressly designed to

influence market dynamics of specific health products,

accelerating their entry to markets, improving their quality

and increasing their level of affordability through bulk

procurement and/or advance purchase commitments. These

activities help to shape the market for specific health

products critically needed to fight HIV, TB, malaria and

hepatitis C.

With the current challenging global economic and

financial crisis, and in view of the high investment needed for

cancer control, innovative financing is the way forward for

the delivery of quality and timely care to cancer patients in

LMICs.

Effective cancer treatment exists and comprehensive

cancer control programmes have shown positive results in

high-income countries. These initiatives can also work in

LMICs too. Cancer should not be a "death sentence" as there

are proven methods of prevention and cure. More than one

third of cancers can be prevented and one third is curable if

detected early and treated properly. What cancer patients in

LMICs urgently need are the type of the high-level political

commitment and financial ingenuity deployed to the fight

against HIV/AIDS.

Conclusion

The international awareness and response to the growing

cancer epidemic has been increasing. In the past ten years

the IAEA, through PACT, has designed and implemented

multiple tools and services aimed at helping Member States

to address the cancer burden. Comprehensive analysis of

country's capacity and needs in cancer control have given

CANCER MANAGEMENT

CANCER CONTROL 2015 45

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074
  75. Page 0075
  76. Page 0076
  77. Page 0077
  78. Page 0078
  79. Page 0079
  80. Page 0080
  81. Page 0081
  82. Page 0082
  83. Page 0083
  84. Page 0084
  85. Page 0085
  86. Page 0086
  87. Page 0087
  88. Page 0088
  89. Page 0089
  90. Page 0090
  91. Page 0091
  92. Page 0092
  93. Page 0093
  94. Page 0094
  95. Page 0095
  96. Page 0096
  97. Page 0097
  98. Page 0098
  99. Page 0099
  100. Page 0100
  101. Page 0101
  102. Page 0102
  103. Page 0103
  104. Page 0104
  105. Page 0105
  106. Page 0106
  107. Page 0107
  108. Page 0108
  109. Page 0109
  110. Page 0110
  111. Page 0111
  112. Page 0112
  113. Page 0113
  114. Page 0114
  115. Page 0115
  116. Page 0116
  117. Page 0117
  118. Page 0118
  119. Page 0119
  120. Page 0120
  121. Page 0121
  122. Page 0122
  123. Page 0123
  124. Page 0124
  125. Page 0125
  126. Page 0126
  127. Page 0127
  128. Page 0128
  129. Page 0129
  130. Page 0130
  131. Page 0131
  132. Page 0132
  133. Page 0133
  134. Page 0134
  135. Page 0135
  136. Page 0136
  137. Page 0137
  138. Page 0138
  139. Page 0139
  140. Page 0140
  141. Page 0141
  142. Page 0142
  143. Page 0143
  144. Page 0144
  145. Page 0145
  146. Page 0146
  147. Page 0147
  148. Page 0148
  149. Page 0149
  150. Page 0150
  151. Page 0151
  152. Page 0152
  153. Page 0153
  154. Page 0154

powered by PageTiger