Page 0067

CANCER MANAGEMENT

CANCER CONTROL 2015 65

N

oncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading

cause of global death and disability (1). Among

these, cancers were responsible for some 8.2

million deaths in 2012 (2). Evidence suggests that a

comprehensive approach to cancer control and prevention

across the life course of an individual will reduce the burden

of the disease. The goal of any comprehensive cancer

prevention and control programme is typically to reduce the

burden of cancer by focusing on three main approaches: 1)

health promotion and lifestyle changes such as tobacco

control; 2) increasing screening and early-stage treatment of

pre-cancers and cancers; and 3) providing timely,

appropriate treatment, patient follow-up and palliative care

for advanced-stage cancers.

In 2008, over 80% of all NCD-related deaths occurred in

low- and middle-income countries (3). Of these, two-thirds

of all cancer-related deaths occurred in low- and middleincome

countries, with some rates even higher (4), such as

breast mortality rates (5). The cancer burden in these

countries is predicted to worsen over time, with an

estimated percentage increase in cancer incidence greater

in low- (82%) and lower-middle-income countries (70%) by

2030, compared with the upper-middle- (58%) and highincome

(40%) country rates (6). This is often related to

problems within the primary health-care infrastructure

where challenges relating to issues with awareness, access,

appropriate policy and data, all of which contribute to

elevated mortality rates. Of over 270,000 women who die

from cervical cancer every year, for example, more than 85%

of these deaths are in low- and middle- income countries and

are linked to systemic problems such as a lack of cervical

cancer policies and programmes, insufficient data,

MOBILE TECHNOLOGY IN CANCER

CONTROL FOR EMERGING HEALTH

SYSTEMS: DIGITAL DIVIDE OR

DIGITAL PROVIDE?

HANI ESKANDAR (LEFT TO RIGHT), ICT APPLICATIONS COORDINATOR,

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS UNION; MARY-ANNE LAND,

CONSULTANT, WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION; VIRGINIA ARNOLD,

PROJECT OFFICER, BLOOMBERG INITIATIVE TO REDUCE TOBACCO USE;

SAMEER PUJARI, JOINT WHO-ITU INITIATIVE ON MHEALTH; VINAYAK M PRASAD, PROJECT MANAGER,

TOBACCO CONTROL, WHO AND SUSANNAH ROBINSON, CONSULTANT, WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

We live in an age of technology optimists, where innovation has become a byword for facilitation,

improvement and success. In the field of development, information and communication technologies

- defined broadly as any technologies used to create, disseminate and manage information, and

including the internet, broadcasting mediums, and both fixed line and mobile telephony - have

repeatedly demonstrated their use value in offering solutions to challenges facing emerging nations.

There is a great deal of excitement around the use of mobile technology to overcome infrastructural

limitations across all fields - business, health, education, agriculture and governance. Health in

particular has seen numerous applications of smartphones and analogue phones being used to

improve health coverage and access to services. The technology has been used to promote health

and healthy behaviours, raise awareness of health risks, facilitate early diagnosis, manage

treatment and adherence, increase surveillance and data collection, and in general improve health

systems management and information sharing. There is however the contrasting view that mobile

services and mobile technology solutions are not yet validated sufficiently to merit their use in

strengthening or replacing existing public health delivery programmes, and have no standard

operating systems.

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074
  75. Page 0075
  76. Page 0076
  77. Page 0077
  78. Page 0078
  79. Page 0079
  80. Page 0080
  81. Page 0081
  82. Page 0082
  83. Page 0083
  84. Page 0084
  85. Page 0085
  86. Page 0086
  87. Page 0087
  88. Page 0088
  89. Page 0089
  90. Page 0090
  91. Page 0091
  92. Page 0092
  93. Page 0093
  94. Page 0094
  95. Page 0095
  96. Page 0096
  97. Page 0097
  98. Page 0098
  99. Page 0099
  100. Page 0100
  101. Page 0101
  102. Page 0102
  103. Page 0103
  104. Page 0104
  105. Page 0105
  106. Page 0106
  107. Page 0107
  108. Page 0108
  109. Page 0109
  110. Page 0110
  111. Page 0111
  112. Page 0112
  113. Page 0113
  114. Page 0114
  115. Page 0115
  116. Page 0116
  117. Page 0117
  118. Page 0118
  119. Page 0119
  120. Page 0120
  121. Page 0121
  122. Page 0122
  123. Page 0123
  124. Page 0124
  125. Page 0125
  126. Page 0126
  127. Page 0127
  128. Page 0128
  129. Page 0129
  130. Page 0130
  131. Page 0131
  132. Page 0132
  133. Page 0133
  134. Page 0134
  135. Page 0135
  136. Page 0136
  137. Page 0137
  138. Page 0138
  139. Page 0139
  140. Page 0140
  141. Page 0141
  142. Page 0142
  143. Page 0143
  144. Page 0144
  145. Page 0145
  146. Page 0146
  147. Page 0147
  148. Page 0148
  149. Page 0149
  150. Page 0150
  151. Page 0151
  152. Page 0152
  153. Page 0153
  154. Page 0154

powered by PageTiger