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CANCER CONTROL PLANNING

30 CANCER CONTROL 2014

References

1. Nugent, R. A., & Feigl, A. B. 2010. Where have all the donors gone? Scarce donor

funding for non-communicable diseases. Center for Global Development.

2. World Health Organization. 2013. World Health Assembly Resolution WHA66.2

Programme Budget 2014-2015. Geneva: World Health Organization

3. World Health Organization. 2011. Global Status Report on Noncommunicable Diseases

2010. Geneva: World Health Organization

4. United Nations. 2013. A New Global Partnership: Eradicate Poverty and Transform

Economies through Sustainable Development, The Report of the High-Level Panel of

Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. New York: United Nations.

5. United Nations. 2013. A life of dignity for all: accelerating progress towards the Millennium

Development Goals and advancing the United Nations development agenda beyond 2015,

Report of the Secretary-General. New York: United Nations.

6. The NCD Alliance was founded by four international NGO federations representing

the four main NCDs - cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory

disease. Together with other major international NGO partners, the NCD Alliance

unites a network of over 2,000 civil society organizations in more than 170 countries.

The mission of the NCD Alliance is to combat the NCD epidemic by putting health at

the centre of all policies.

7. Leadership Council of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network. 2013. An

Action Agenda for Sustainable Development, Report for the UN Secretary-General.

http://unsdsn.org/files/2013/06/130613-sdsn-an-action-agenda-for-sustainabledevelopment-final.pdf

8. NCD Alliance. 2013. NCD Alliance Response to the UN-NGLS Consultation on Post-2015

Reports. Available at: http://www.ncdalliance.org/post2015resources

9. United Nations. 2011. Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting of the General

Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases

10. Bloom, D. E., Cafiero, E. T., Jane-Llopis, E., et al. 2011. The Global Economic Burden of

Non-communicable Diseases. Geneva: World Economic Forum.

11. Nugent, R. A., & Feigl, A. B. 2010. Where have all the donors gone? Scarce donor funding

for non-communicable diseases. Center for Global Development.

12. World Health Organization. 2011. Scaling up action against noncommunicable diseases:

how much will it cost? Geneva: World Health Organization.

13. Nugent, R. A., & Feigl, A. B. 2010. Where have all the donors gone? Scarce donor funding

for non-communicable diseases. Center for Global Development.

14. Ferlay J, Soerjomataram I, Ervik M, Dikshit R, Eser S, Mathers C, Rebelo M, Parkin DM,

Forman D, Bray, f.globocan 2012 v1.0, Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide:

IARC CancerBase No. 11 [Internet]. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research

on Cancer; 2013.

15. Ribeiro RC, Steliarova-Foucher E, Magrath I, Lemerle J, Eden T, Forget C, Mortara I,

Tabah-Fisch I, Divino JJ, Miklavec T, Howard SC, Cavalli F. 2008. Baseline status of

paediatric oncology care in ten low-income or mid-income countries receiving My

Child Matters support: a descriptive study. Lancet Oncology 2008 Aug;9(8):721-9

16. ibid

17. Pritchard-Jones, K., Pieters R., Reaman, G. H., Hjorth, L., Downie, P., Calaminus, G.,

Naafs-Wilstra, M. C., Steliarova-Foucher, E., 2013. Sustaining innovation and improvement

in the treatment of childhood cancer: lessons from high-income countries.

www.thelancetoncology.com Published online Februray 20, 2013

18. Treat the Pain. 2013. Access to Essential Pain Medicines Brief. Available from:

http://www.treatthepain.org

19. Cherney, N.I., Baselga, J., de Conno, F., Radbruch, L. 2010. Formulary availability and

regulatory barriers to accessibility of opioids for cancer pain in Europe: a report from

the ESMO/EAPC Opioid Policy Initiative. Annals of Oncology 21: 615-626, 2010

20. Cherny NI, Cleary J, Scholten W et al. The Global Opioid Policy Initiative (GOPI)

project to evaluate the availability and accessibility of opioids for the management of

cancer pain in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East:

introduction and methodology. Ann Oncol 2013; 24 (Supplement 11): xi7-xi13.

21. Knaul, F. M., Frenk, J., & Shulman, L. 2011. Closing the Cancer Divide: A Blueprint to

Expand Access in Low and Middle Income Countries. Harvard Global Equity Initiative.

Boston: Global Task Force on Expanded Access to Cancer Care and Control in Developing

Countries.

commitments within the Political Declaration and the

GMF, and to push for cancer to be mainstreamed in the

post-2015 development agenda. l

Cary Adams was born in London and has a BSc Honours degree

in Economics, Computing and Statistics from the University of

Bath, United Kingdom and a Masters degree (with Distinction)

in Business Administration. He is a Harvard Business School

Alumni having attended the School's Executive General

Management programme in 2003.

In 2009, he made a career change, moving from the

management of international businesses in the banking sector

to become CEO of the UICC, based in Geneva. He is also Chair

of the NCD Alliance, a coalition of around 2,000 NGOs working

on non-communicable diseases, which includes cancer,

diabetes, heart and respiratory diseases.

Rebecca Morton Doherty joined UICC in 2011 as Advocacy and

Programmes Coordination Manager, and continues to

coordinate UICC's advocacy efforts in the non-communicable

diseases arena, with an increasing focus on the post-2015

development agenda.

She has a BA Honours degree in Political Sciences from the

University of Warwick, and a Masters degree in Gender and

Development from the London School of Economics. Prior to

joining UICC, Rebecca spent six years working in London and

and Geneva-based NGOs in advocacy and communications

roles.

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