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CANCER MANAGEMENT

CANCER CONTROL 2014 79

implementation of cancer /NCD control interventions.

Insights into the probability that a meeting will influence

population health and illness outcomes can be gleaned by

answering four questions:

‰ Why is the meeting being held? What is its purpose?

International meetings are held for different purposes:

- To present "state-of-the-art" disease management with a

focus on the disease (cancer/cancer type) and the

interventions to modify the disease impact. Examples

include breast, lymphoma and lung meetings.

- To present "state-of the-art" modality management with

a focus on the modality, the discipline(s) of practice, and

advances in science and technology. Examples include

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the

American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and

Oncology (ASTRO).

- To raise awareness, profile and advocacy for control of

the disease through an organization, society or forum.

Examples include American Cancer Society, LiveStrong,

Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), World

Cancer Forum and the World Cancer Leaders Summit.

- To implement plans and solutions for reducing the

burden of the disease at a population level. Examples

include the ICCC.

The purpose of the conference will determine the

constituencies who will be present (the attendees and their

relationships), the context for consideration ("discovery"

science/scientific evidence-base; contextual adaptation;

relevance and translation of science to policy and practice;

science and technology development), and the funding

support. Revenue to support the meeting derives from

registration fees, organization or society membership

contributions, industry or governmental sponsorship, private

sector contributions and charitable and/or Foundation

support (Table 1). Funding support, other than registration, is

generally higher when the purposes of the meeting and the

interests of funders are aligned.

An appropriate way to define the purpose of a conference

is through a "logic model" that addresses the purpose; goals,

objectives and key directions; measures of process ("how"),

and measures of output and outcome, and impact. This

approach to conference design aligns purpose, product,

outcome and evaluation and, additionally, identifies where

the most appropriate sources of conference revenue are

likely to come from for specific programme components.

‰ Who is intended to derive the most benefit from the

meeting? There are many constituencies who may benefit

individually and/or collectively from a cancer control

meeting:

- Individual practitioners and/or their professional

organizations/societies who represent scientific

"discovery", clinical advance or application of measures

to advance disease control.

- High, middle or low-resource constituencies who face

the issue of disease control from different contexts,

resources and capacities.

- Global and regional individuals/groups who stand to

benefit through shared information, learning,

mentorship and support to develop or enhance

population-based cancer control.

The constituencies most intended to benefit should

influence the "content" (the programme, the focus and the

balance of interventional activities), the "context" (adaptation

of content to context, cultures, priorities, resources, capacity,

preparedness and resolve) and the breadth of participation

and collaboration, both interdisciplinary and intersectoral,

that is likely to ensue and be required.

‰ Where is the meeting being held? Where the meeting is

located will have a bearing on the probability that it will

achieve its purpose. The possibilities include:

- A jurisdiction of global political awareness and social

advocacy.

- A jurisdiction of the major financial

contributors/sponsors.

- The nations/countries who are primarily intended to

benefit from conference participation.

- A location of convenience for travel or prices.

Meetings held in jurisdictions of high global political

awareness and social advocacy, such as Geneva, Washington

DC, or New York, are likely to attract delegates from highresource regions, or those from low- and middle-resource

countries whose attendance is fully sponsored (registration

fees, travel, accommodation, and hospitality costs). Delegates

from low- and middle-resource nations are least likely to

benefit from presentations that address cancer control

programmes in high-resource settings. Accordingly, the

location of the conference is likely to have a profound

influence upon participant attendance from low- and middleresource settings, and also upon the content, context,

and

relevance to practice within low- and middle-resource

settings. In principle, the location of the meeting has a direct

bearing upon both the probability of attendance, the

relevance of the content of the meeting on the intended

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