Page 0032

CANCER CONTROL PLANNING

CANCER CONTROL 2014 31

N

on-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the world's

number one killer, bringing hardship to rich and

poor nations alike. As the largest contributors to

mortality both globally and in the majority of low- and

middle-income countries, NCDs account for 60%, or 35

million of all deaths worldwide, exacting a high toll on

population well-being and economic vitality.

1 The largest

burden - 80% (28 million) - occurs in low- and middleincome countries, making NCDs an urgent development

issue as well as a major cause of poverty. They will be the

leading global cause of disability by 2030.2

The adoption by the UN General Assembly of the UN

Political Declaration on NCD prevention and control in 2011

was a landmark moment, putting cancer and NCDs on the

political - not just health - agenda. The Declaration contains

22 action-oriented commitments covering the spectrum of

NCD prevention, treatment and care. It commits

governments to ensuring that NCDs are at the centre of

health and development planning, increasing resources and

driving a whole-of-society and whole-of-government

response to the problem. In essence, it lays the foundation for

a new era of political leadership, multisectoral action, and

international cooperation on NCDs.3 The specificities of

cancer control (e. g. vaccination and screening) are an integral

part of the declaration and particularly mentioned in the

narrative as disease-specific interventions.

The UN Political Declaration 2011 also has set in motion a

World Health Organization (WHO) led and Member States

driven process to develop a new global architecture for NCDs

that comprises four core elements:

‰ The Global NCD Action Plan (GAP) as agreed by the

World Health Assembly 2013 will define the priorities

over the next seven years and recommend clear actions

for all sectors;

‰ The Global Monitoring Framework and its targets and

indicators as part of the GAP to monitor progress

towards its implementation;

‰ The establishment of the NCD United Nations

Interagency Task Force;

‰ A Global Coordination Mechanism will mobilize

multisectoral action and resources of a broad range of

stakeholders to see the plan fully implemented.4

Clinical cancer care plays a significant role in global cancer

control, and two of the nine voluntary targets for 2025 (as a

follow-up of the UN Political Declaration5) are closely

related: the global target (25 by 25) for reduction in cancer

mortality, and the target on coverage by essential NCD

medicines and technologies. In this context, the European

Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) aims to play a pivotal

ESMO'S GLOBAL CANCER TASK

FORCE: PROMOTING CANCER

AND NON-COMMUNICABLE

DISEASE CONTROL WORLDWIDE

JOSE M MARTIN-MORENO (LEFT) MEMBER, ESMO PUBLIC POLICY COMMITTEE,

EDUARDO CAZAP (MIDDLE) DEPUTY CHAIR, ESMO EMERGING COUNTRIES

COMMITTEE AND DAVID KERR (RIGHT) PAST ESMO PRESIDENT AND MEMBER, ESMO

EMERGING COUNTRIES COMMITTEE

The primary goal of the ESMO Global Cancer Task Force is to make the case for better cancer

screening and care within the broader agenda of the WHO Global NCD Action Plan 2013-

2020 for the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases. Specific objectives will

be pursued in collaboration with leading oncology societies, through a pooling of technical

and scientific expertise as well as through knowledge-brokering actions carried out with

national and European policy-makers and political advisers.

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