Page 0082

CANCER MANAGEMENT

CANCER CONTROL 2014 81

the viability of the meeting (Table 1). Meetings convened for

the purposes of disease management, modality management

and advocacy are the most common types of international

meetings as they have the highest likelihood of funding.

However, arguably, they have the lowest probability of

enhancing population health and cancer/NCD outcomes as

they address only a segment of the cancer control

continuum and attract a relatively limited range of

professions. In contrast, meetings convened to discuss

implementation of cancer/NCD control plans are targeted at

all professions involved in cancer/NCD control in all regions

of the world. They have the lowest appeal for and probability

of funding and are thus the least common, but have a greater

potential for the impact.

UN Member States have accepted the challenge of a 25%

reduction in premature mortality from NCDs, including

cancer, by 2025, which translates into a >2% annual reduction

at a time when high-resourced nations have achieved a 1%

annual reduction and to which cardiovascular and

cerebrovascular mortality have been the dominant

contributors. This would imply that the learning and

experience of the high-resource world would need to be

adapted, leveraged, adopted and maximized through strategic

decisions and allocation of resources if the "25% by 2025"

mortality reduction from NCDs is to be realized.

If resources are to be put towards international meetings,

then the types of meetings that are held and the shift of

balance towards those that can have maximum impact upon

improving cancer/NCD outcomes needs to become a strategic

priority. Are we really strategic about the purpose of meetings

convened before embarking on their promotion, funding and

conduct? Do we have a basis for evaluating meetings and

establishing their value if their purpose, goals, objectives,

directions, outputs and outcomes have never been explicitly

defined? Can we align with resolutions such as the Global

Action Plan and its targets if the meetings convened do not

align to the populations, interventions, measures and

participation appropriate to achieving these goals?

This is more than a philosophical or semantic debate. This

paper is intended to cause us to reflect on "do the right people

come to the right place, at the right time, for the right reasons

and with the right expectations to improve cancer/NCD

control outcomes"? Given the enormity of the cancer /NCD

burden challenge ahead, it will be essential to create the right

environment and secure funding to bring together the right

people, at the right time, for the right reasons to enact the

changes that are inherent in successful attainment of the

Global Action Plan goals and targets. l

Acknowledgments

The opinions expressed herein represent those of the authors alone

and do not necessarily represent the institutions and organizations

by which they are employed.

Dr Simon B Sutcliffe chairs the Board of the Institute for Health

Systems Transformation and Sustainability; is President of the

International Cancer Control Congress Association, the

International Network for Cancer Treatment and Research-

Canada Branch (Two Worlds Cancer Collaboration); is a Senior

Advisor to the Terry Fox Research Institute and is Chief Medical

Officer for QuBiologics Inc. and Omnitura Inc.

He is a graduate of St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK in

1970. Dr Sutcliffe's training encompassed internal medicine,

scientific research, medical and radiation oncology in the UK,

South Africa, the United States and Canada. Staff appointments

have been held at St Bartholomew's Hospital, Princess Margaret

Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute and the BC Cancer Agency.

He has been President and CEO of the Princess Margaret

Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute and the BC Cancer Agency.

He is a past Chair of the Board of the Canadian Partnership

Against Cancer (CPAC, 2009-2012), the Michael Smith

Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR, 2006-7) and has

nt and

nt Attractiveness for

external funding

High

High

High

Low

Appropriateness for

non-profit

sponsorship and

direction

Accepted

Accepted

Inappropriate

Highly

inappropriate

Potential

Funding

Security

High

High

High

Low

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